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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
What is a good amount of watts someone that is about 5'5'' should put out? With weight ranging from in the high 130's to the low 150's. I'm curious if i put out more or less than the avg. rider about my size or so.
 

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The chart seems pretty close in the middle, but the lower end seem way off. I know quite a few recreational riders that weigh close to me that can't put out 900 watts @ 90Kg for 5 seconds. This would equal the 10 watts per Kg that is listed at the bottom of the chart for untrained riders.
 

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You need more info, like "at time-trial pace" "in a sprint" etc.

Not to mention what you mean by "average rider."

Since you're not an elite rider looking for ways to improve a specific area, but rather trying to see how badass you are compared to your buddies or whoever, just go on a fast, competitive group ride. Contest the city-limits sprint and a hillclimb. If you drop everyone, you're going good. If you are dropped, you're slower than they are.
 

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MR_GRUMPY said:
The chart seems pretty close in the middle, but the lower end seem way off. I know quite a few recreational riders that weigh close to me that can't put out 900 watts @ 90Kg for 5 seconds. This would equal the 10 watts per Kg that is listed at the bottom of the chart for untrained riders.
Well the 5sec range is probably going to be the least trainable and the least trained. How often do recreational riders work on their sprint?
 

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250w in one hour. 300w for 5 minutes. 500w for 1 minutes. With this power profile, you will have the race fitness of a cat3. Not necessary the experience of a cat3 though.

Rum_Runner1 said:
What is a good amount of watts someone that is about 5'5'' should put out? With weight ranging from in the high 130's to the low 150's. I'm curious if i put out more or less than the avg. rider about my size or so.
 

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Dwayne Barry said:
Well the 5sec range is probably going to be the least trainable and the least trained. How often do recreational riders work on their sprint?
The top of the 5 second and 1 minute columns are anchored by top track racers (not roadies!) so any endurance cyclist is/should be a few rows lower in those columns.

In general, I think 5 second power is the least trained. However, it's very quickly trained from a low level to at least an acceptable one.
 

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Umm

MR_GRUMPY said:
The chart seems pretty close in the middle, but the lower end seem way off. I know quite a few recreational riders that weigh close to me that can't put out 900 watts @ 90Kg for 5 seconds. This would equal the 10 watts per Kg that is listed at the bottom of the chart for untrained riders.

This may sound dumb, but looking at that chart...what does FT stand for?
 

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MR_GRUMPY said:
The chart seems pretty close in the middle, but the lower end seem way off. I know quite a few recreational riders that weigh close to me that can't put out 900 watts @ 90Kg for 5 seconds. This would equal the 10 watts per Kg that is listed at the bottom of the chart for untrained riders.
I don't think the chart was constructed by using clydesdale data, my numbers look pathetic but I'm still a quite competitive cat 3. Then again, we don't realy have any climbs here in tx.
 

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52-16SS said:
I don't think the chart was constructed by using clydesdale data, my numbers look pathetic but I'm still a quite competitive cat 3. Then again, we don't realy have any climbs here in tx.
The purpose of the chart is NOT to give an idea of what category you should be in. Straight from the cycling peaks website "after all, the best measure of a rider's competitive ability relative to that of others is their actual race performance, not their power output." Which, obviously, you have figured out. The category markings are mostly for curiosities sake and were put back in due to popular demand (they were removed from the second version). The purpose is to compare the riders own abilities to identify strengths and weaknesses.
 

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The chart seems "dead on" on the top end. I was informed that the top sprinter on our elite team can put out 1800 watts in a sprint. this equals 21W/Kg.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Sorry about the conversion question but anyway

I was wondering if a stationary bike watts reading is a good measure of what you put out on the road, plus what is a good amount of watts for a person my size?
 

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Depends upon what you mean by "stationary bike."

If it's the kind at a gym or health club, they are terrible.

A properly calibrated Compu-trainer (an expensive stationary trainer that hooks up to a computer) is pretty decent.

I'd like to help answer your question about "good" watts, but you're being pretty vague. First of all, do you mean "good" compared to the average recreational rider, a Cat 3 men's pack, or what? Second, you need to figure out over what duration. Good power for 5 seconds is far different than for 5 minutes is far different than for an hour.

That chart Shawndoggy posted is pretty good.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
what I mean

I mean what are good watts for a person my size (not world class rider of course but lets say a cat 3-4) over a sustained ride lets say the FT? I am also talking about a stationary bike at the gym.
 

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Stationary bikes at the gym are pretty terrible. I messed about on one once and it claimed I was doing something like 450 watts at an effort that I know couldn't have been more than 300, probably more like 250. They can be amusing, but that's about it.

According to that chart, 3.75 watts / kg / hr is decent for a Cat 3-4 Senior Men's rider. For a rider about 150 lb = 68kg, you'd be doing okay if you could produce 255 watts for an hour, 305 watts for 5 min, or 550 watts for 1 min.

Does that help?

FWIW, lacking a power meter, I'd suggest finding a hill in your area that takes 4-6 minutes to climb. Fairly straight is best, and do it on a calm day. Use something like <a href=http://www.gmap-pedometer.com/>gmap pedometer</a> to determine the distance traveled and elevation gain. Record your time.

Pro's trainers have for years used vertical feet per minute as a good rule of thumb for speed; it could give you some idea. You can even use <a href=http://www.analyticcycling.com/ForcesPower_Page.html>analytic cycling</a> to calculate somewhere in the vicinity of your power.


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For comparison, pros spit out 400-ish watts for an hour. One domestic pro said he did a 5-hour indoor trainer rider, "averaging 200 watts, just because."
 

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Rum_Runner1 said:
I mean what are good watts for a person my size (not world class rider of course but lets say a cat 3-4) over a sustained ride lets say the FT? I am also talking about a stationary bike at the gym.
Size is irrelevant. Watts/Kg is the measure. Stationary bikes at the gym won't be accurate.
 
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