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I have a Bianchi bike I built-up, not production bike. It is a Bianchi '98 Dedacciai Zero Uno Veloce steel frame. I added a threadless full carbon fork, Campy drivetrain with carbon crank, Topolino wheels, Ritchey stem/handlebar, Chris King NoThread headset, Selle saddle, and Alpha Q seatpost. Together, the weight is a sub-18 w/out pedals; near 18.5 riding weight with pedals, cages, bag, etc. Wondering if I should keep my set-up and change the Campy crank to compact for mountainous climbs, or buy another Bianchi frame to create a "climbing bike". Am I going to feel a BIG difference in climbing with a different frame and compact drivetrain? Or, is my roughly 4 lb. steel frame ok? :confused:
 

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My bianchi is 11 years older than yours, its a fine climbing frame:D

I guess the one solution to climbing is lighter... a whole new bike

Pantani won on Bianchi steel frames (98 TDF and Giro)
 

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probably not tell much

us_wr said:
I have a Bianchi bike I built-up, not production bike. It is a Bianchi '98 Dedacciai Zero Uno Veloce steel frame. I added a threadless full carbon fork, Campy drivetrain with carbon crank, Topolino wheels, Ritchey stem/handlebar, Chris King NoThread headset, Selle saddle, and Alpha Q seatpost. Together, the weight is a sub-18 w/out pedals; near 18.5 riding weight with pedals, cages, bag, etc. Wondering if I should keep my set-up and change the Campy crank to compact for mountainous climbs, or buy another Bianchi frame to create a "climbing bike". Am I going to feel a BIG difference in climbing with a different frame and compact drivetrain? Or, is my roughly 4 lb. steel frame ok? :confused:
I have a 2000 Bianchi EV2, also a "Pantani" bike, that I built up to 12 pounds for a special climbing bike for the Furnace Creek 508 (can use multible bikes with crew vehicles). I used very light carbon wheels, light tubulars, one front ring, no front derailleur or shifter, and only a front brake, and a downtube shifter for the rear, and all other very light parts. On that, I could tell the difference. It accellerated like a rocket on steep hills, or at least felt like it.

I'll be damned if I can tell much difference between a 16 and an 18 pound bike, though. At best, you'll notice it on initial accelleration. No way on steady climbing, though. I've spent tons of money, well over $10k on light stuff for bikes, and I've always been sorely disappointed in the value of that money spent. Like I said, it feels good initially, but ultimately the weight saved is still only a few pounds off your 150-200 pound total system, which is what counts. You can spend thousands and maybe get a few seconds off a 5 mile climb. Up to you whether it's worth it, but just know what to expect, that's all.

The one best thing you can do to improve climbing is to have sufficiently low gears so that you can keep your crank rpms up to around 90 at any time you want. That can make far more of a difference than a few pounds.
 

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Ev2

I, too, have the Bianchi EV2 "Pantani" bike, this one a 2001. Straight aluminum frame with a FSA compact crank set up and 13-26 in the back. For me, it's a superb climbiing bike, very stiff.
 
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