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I have this dilemma, I have been using a heart rate monitor to help my training for the past few years (not training for racing, just to improve fitness level and riding comfort/distance). In the beginning I was using the HAC4 and currently am using the Garmin Edge 305. My question is that I seem to have the same results with both monitors (so I am thinking I should rule out the monitors as a possible fault, only changed monitors as I wanted different features one didn't offer over the other, i.e. rear wheel mount for trainer use), and I am wondering if it something congenital. When I ride my exertion level doesn't seem that high (I can carry on conversations and such without problem), but I am routinely running in the 165-185 bpm range. Yesterday, I went for a ride with moderate wind (6-9 mph) and about 60 degree temp for 32 miles. Before even stepping on the bike, I was registering 123 bpm, and during I was always in the 170-185 range (did a few moderate hills) while averaging about 17 mph. Today I was averaging about 16 mph with 57 degree temp and little to no wind (with a 15 lb pack as this is my commute day), and I was running about 163-175 bpm for the 9.5 miles to work. I routinely check my BP and it is within acceptable range as per my doctor (123/83) and the system usually measures my heart rate at about 90-99 bpm. I have slept with the the heart rate monitor on and the average was about 65 bpm (this is what I am basing my resting heart rate at). Is there anything I can do to lower my heart rate, as I don't want to overexert my heart and is this something that I should be worried about?? I can and have seen many times my heart rate in excess of 205 bpm. I am getting in to see the doctor, but wanted others opinions. I am 35, 195 lbs, and 6'0", so I am slightly overweight, but I am a stocky person that has alot of bulk and no history of heart disease within the family. Should I be worried????
 

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squeakr said:
I have this dilemma, I have been using a heart rate monitor to help my training for the past few years (not training for racing, just to improve fitness level and riding comfort/distance). In the beginning I was using the HAC4 and currently am using the Garmin Edge 305. My question is that I seem to have the same results with both monitors (so I am thinking I should rule out the monitors as a possible fault, only changed monitors as I wanted different features one didn't offer over the other, i.e. rear wheel mount for trainer use), and I am wondering if it something congenital. When I ride my exertion level doesn't seem that high (I can carry on conversations and such without problem), but I am routinely running in the 165-185 bpm range. Yesterday, I went for a ride with moderate wind (6-9 mph) and about 60 degree temp for 32 miles. Before even stepping on the bike, I was registering 123 bpm, and during I was always in the 170-185 range (did a few moderate hills) while averaging about 17 mph. Today I was averaging about 16 mph with 57 degree temp and little to no wind (with a 15 lb pack as this is my commute day), and I was running about 163-175 bpm for the 9.5 miles to work. I routinely check my BP and it is within acceptable range as per my doctor (123/83) and the system usually measures my heart rate at about 90-99 bpm. I have slept with the the heart rate monitor on and the average was about 65 bpm (this is what I am basing my resting heart rate at). Is there anything I can do to lower my heart rate, as I don't want to overexert my heart and is this something that I should be worried about?? I can and have seen many times my heart rate in excess of 205 bpm. I am getting in to see the doctor, but wanted others opinions. I am 35, 195 lbs, and 6'0", so I am slightly overweight, but I am a stocky person that has alot of bulk and no history of heart disease within the family. Should I be worried????
Do you know your max heart rate (MHR)? The only way to know if your heart rates are too high/too low etc is to compare them with your MHR. There is an 220-age method of determining your MHR, but that is not very accurate. Your resting heart rate is a little high, especially if you are very fit and have good cardio.

Joe Friel's Cycling Training Bible recommends a 10 minute time trial, sprinting the last 30 seconds to determine the max heart rate. He recommends this be done twice, and take the average max of the two. I'd check with your doctor first before doing the test...
 

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squeakr said:
I have this dilemma, I have been using a heart rate monitor to help my training for the past few years (not training for racing, just to improve fitness level and riding comfort/distance). In the beginning I was using the HAC4 and currently am using the Garmin Edge 305. My question is that I seem to have the same results with both monitors (so I am thinking I should rule out the monitors as a possible fault, only changed monitors as I wanted different features one didn't offer over the other, i.e. rear wheel mount for trainer use), and I am wondering if it something congenital. When I ride my exertion level doesn't seem that high (I can carry on conversations and such without problem), but I am routinely running in the 165-185 bpm range. Yesterday, I went for a ride with moderate wind (6-9 mph) and about 60 degree temp for 32 miles. Before even stepping on the bike, I was registering 123 bpm, and during I was always in the 170-185 range (did a few moderate hills) while averaging about 17 mph. Today I was averaging about 16 mph with 57 degree temp and little to no wind (with a 15 lb pack as this is my commute day), and I was running about 163-175 bpm for the 9.5 miles to work. I routinely check my BP and it is within acceptable range as per my doctor (123/83) and the system usually measures my heart rate at about 90-99 bpm. I have slept with the the heart rate monitor on and the average was about 65 bpm (this is what I am basing my resting heart rate at). Is there anything I can do to lower my heart rate, as I don't want to overexert my heart and is this something that I should be worried about?? I can and have seen many times my heart rate in excess of 205 bpm. I am getting in to see the doctor, but wanted others opinions. I am 35, 195 lbs, and 6'0", so I am slightly overweight, but I am a stocky person that has alot of bulk and no history of heart disease within the family. Should I be worried????
Get the medical tests first. It may well be that you just have a high MaxHR, but
why take chances.

BTW, your resting HR is the minimum overnight (some HR monitors will record this) or the HR when you first wake up NOT the average for overnight.

TF
 

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If you've seen it up over 205 regularly, you may very well just have a high MaxHR.

just a follow up to the last post...your resting rate is your overnight low? I've never heard this before. I've always taken it after sitting down for 5 mins or so and called that my resting HR. My HR when I wake up (I have slept with the monitor a few times) is usually higher than what it records as my overnight low...and by a significant amount. Overnight low is generally in the low 40s, am recording before getting out of bed usually in the high 40's low 50's.
 

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From a reprint from Pez:

"I coach two racers in their mid 30s. I have a standard monthly five-mile road test (hill climb) which they both complete in about 19 minutes. The only difference? One rider does it at 155 bpm and the other at 205. Same age, similar power output, similar weight, 50 beat difference in heart rate. There's nothing wrong with either of them, they're just different. "

http://www.active.com/story.cfm?story_id=12831

TF
 

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meathead said:
If you've seen it up over 205 regularly, you may very well just have a high MaxHR.

just a follow up to the last post...your resting rate is your overnight low? I've never heard this before. I've always taken it after sitting down for 5 mins or so and called that my resting HR. My HR when I wake up (I have slept with the monitor a few times) is usually higher than what it records as my overnight low...and by a significant amount. Overnight low is generally in the low 40s, am recording before getting out of bed usually in the high 40's low 50's.
The most common method is to take it as soon as you wake up because most people have no way to get the minimum. The wake-up method is also best done without an alarm clock - not feasible for most people.

I have a Reebok HRM that records the minimum and I have worn it overnight. I don't totally trust it since I think it loses 'contact' at times and this may skew the recorded value. I would look to something that records the data every second or two and and look at the data if I really needed this number.

How you do it depends on your goal. If you want your true minimum resting HR, it has to be your minimum. If you are using it to help gauge when to do another hard training ride, then look at the change in whatever method you use to measure it - just be consistent.

TF

EDIT: From the same Active.com article I quoted above (or below, depending):

"First thing every morning

Tracking your resting heart rate is one of the easiest and most important elements (but possibly most neglected training tools) the cyclist has to monitor their level of exhaustion. Simply take it each morning before you get up out of bed.

Once again, don't put too much emphasis on the number itself. Just because your training partner has a resting heart rate of 35 and yours is 55 doesn't mean he's in better shape than you. What is important, is to watch the flow of the numbers and look at the big picture rather than any individual day.

The general guideline is that a 10-percent increase in resting heart rate indicates that the body isn't recovered from the previous day's workout. However when you keep your training log, make sure to note other factors that could be affecting your resting heart rate.

The stress of waking up at 5:00 a.m. to a day where you'll try to squeeze in a two-hour training ride so you can make an 8:00 a.m. meeting and then work through lunch so you can pick up the kids from school at 3:00, come home, grab a snack and then head out to a night at your in-laws could easily be responsible for a 10-percent increase in resting heart rate and doesn't necessarily mean you should skip those hill repeats."
 

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squeakr said:
I have this dilemma, I have been using a heart rate monitor to help my training for the past few years (not training for racing, just to improve fitness level and riding comfort/distance). In the beginning I was using the HAC4 and currently am using the Garmin Edge 305. My question is that I seem to have the same results with both monitors (so I am thinking I should rule out the monitors as a possible fault, only changed monitors as I wanted different features one didn't offer over the other, i.e. rear wheel mount for trainer use), and I am wondering if it something congenital. When I ride my exertion level doesn't seem that high (I can carry on conversations and such without problem), but I am routinely running in the 165-185 bpm range. Yesterday, I went for a ride with moderate wind (6-9 mph) and about 60 degree temp for 32 miles. Before even stepping on the bike, I was registering 123 bpm, and during I was always in the 170-185 range (did a few moderate hills) while averaging about 17 mph. Today I was averaging about 16 mph with 57 degree temp and little to no wind (with a 15 lb pack as this is my commute day), and I was running about 163-175 bpm for the 9.5 miles to work. I routinely check my BP and it is within acceptable range as per my doctor (123/83) and the system usually measures my heart rate at about 90-99 bpm. I have slept with the the heart rate monitor on and the average was about 65 bpm (this is what I am basing my resting heart rate at). Is there anything I can do to lower my heart rate, as I don't want to overexert my heart and is this something that I should be worried about?? I can and have seen many times my heart rate in excess of 205 bpm. I am getting in to see the doctor, but wanted others opinions. I am 35, 195 lbs, and 6'0", so I am slightly overweight, but I am a stocky person that has alot of bulk and no history of heart disease within the family. Should I be worried????
I am your near twin from a parallel universe.

My HR range and resting heart rate are identical to yours. Tuesday's ride I averaged a 169 over a 25 mile ride. I am also stocky, 33, 195lbs, but only 5"10.5. I talked to a cardiologist at a chamber of commerce meeting and he said that if I wasn't uncomfortable not to worry. He also said that the rates would drop as I got in better condition. Also, I started a near identical thread that got some very good responses.

http://forums.roadbikereview.com/showthread.php?t=59602
 

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2 things here:

1- Your max HR is basically 220 minus your age. Its a rough guidline but it works well for about 95% of people. If your worried that your HR is to high then i suggest you see your doctor for an EKG and follow up. He/she might want to do an echo cardiogram or other cardiac studies. Your probably fine to keep exercising but if ur concerned see a mediacl professoinal. Also prior to exercise your HR will increase just because your are thinking about exercise this is a normal physiologic function as your body prepares for increased work. Most people dont realise this because they arent monitoring their heart rate.

2- Your resting HR is the lowest it goes when your alseep or the average. If you wear your HR monitor at night take the average for the hours you slept. If you dont do that you take it first thing in the morning when you awake.... from a peacful slumber.... not being awoke by a nightmare or a beautiful naked girl.... as either would increase your HR. Do that for three days and average... thats your resting HR. Sitting for 5 minutes may approxiamate it but not the best way to do it.

Hope that is helpful....
 

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Half right

montyburns said:
Your max HR is basically 220 minus your age. Its a rough guidline but it works well for about 95% of people.
Yes, and the 5% (or whatever) for which it can be wildly inaccurate are fit, athletic people. I regularly ride long distances at an HR that is at or above my Max as calculated by this formula. Max HR is not all that useful for these discussions anyway. People should be worried about their MSS (max steady state) HR, which is essentially their Lactate Threshold or Anaerobic Threshold. This is the HR they can sustain for the last 20 minutes of an all-out 30 minute ride.
 

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1. Check with your doctor if you haven't already. Better safe than sorry.
2. HR parameters are genetic. Some individuals who are the same weight, age and have the same conditioning can have HR's that differ 30-50 bpm.
3. Do some reading: "Heart Zone Training" and "The Heart Rate Monitor Book for Cyclists" both by Sally Edwards are excellent foundations for understanding your heart ranges.

Good luck
 

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montyburns said:
2 things here:

1- Your max HR is basically 220 minus your age. Its a rough guidline but it works well for about 95% of people. ....
Wrong. This is right for maybe 5% of people. It is so definitely wrong for everyone else. Please do not use this information.
 

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Windrider (Stubborn)
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Ignore hthis post....

montyburns said:
2 things here:

1- Your max HR is basically 220 minus your age. Its a rough guidline but it works well for about 95% of people. If your worried that your HR is to high then i suggest you see your doctor for an EKG and follow up. He/she might want to do an echo cardiogram or other cardiac studies. Your probably fine to keep exercising but if ur concerned see a mediacl professoinal. Also prior to exercise your HR will increase just because your are thinking about exercise this is a normal physiologic function as your body prepares for increased work. Most people dont realise this because they arent monitoring their heart rate.

.
as this is bad information.

220-age is an inappropriate measure for most fit people (as others have indicated).

I've been riding for 30 years, I am almost 51.....by the formula, My Max S/B 169......I can sustain 180 for over an hour.....I have recently observed 205 and wasn't blacking out (so I know it wasn't near my max. Max heartrate is genetically determined and there is very little you can do to affect it via training. What you can effect is your LT heartrate. That is what you should be measuring and testing.

And to the poster who said that max HR was measured using the avg HR for the last 20 minutes of a 30 minute TT...that is wrong....that is how you measure your LT.

To the original poster......I woule consult a DR for peace of mind, but My guess is that you just have a geneticcally high heartrate.....nothing to worry about.

Len
 

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Len J said:
I have recently observed 205 and wasn't blacking out (so I know it wasn't near my max.
Len, when my HRM reads 205 or so, I know that there is either some electrical interference or my jersey is flapping enough to give false readings. Yesterday, I was going at a good pace and looked at my HRM. It read 205. I put a hand across my chest and the reading dropped to 143. This was a jersey and fits good and is body hugging, but there still was enoght flapping to upset the HRM.
 

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The only time I see 205..........

MikeBiker said:
Len, when my HRM reads 205 or so, I know that there is either some electrical interference or my jersey is flapping enough to give false readings. Yesterday, I was going at a good pace and looked at my HRM. It read 205. I put a hand across my chest and the reading dropped to 143. This was a jersey and fits good and is body hugging, but there still was enoght flapping to upset the HRM.
is when I am going flat out up a hill chasing someone either in front of me or off my wheel.....trust me, this has nothing to do with flapping jerseys. It's also about 12% above my measured LT which is about right.

I've read about this flapping jersy/high HR issue...I've never had this problem & I wear everything from tight to loose jerseys......I would recommend 2 solutions, tighten the strap & make sure it is just below your pecs with the strap in back higher &, make sure you wet the contact portion of the strap before you put it on.......20 years of wearing a HRM and never had a problem.

Len
 

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One year in the 80s, the TdF published resting and max HRs for all the riders. Bernard Hinault had something like a resting HR of 34 and max of 185. Some other guy in the peloton had a resting HR of 75 but a max of 240!

220-age is a rough rule of thumb for sedentary people. It's going to be even less accurate for a fit cyclist.
 

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Reading for comprehension

Len J said:
And to the poster who said that max HR was measured using the avg HR for the last 20 minutes of a 30 minute TT...that is wrong....that is how you measure your LT.
So, Len, this is what I posted: "People should be worried about their MSS (max steady state) HR, which is essentially their Lactate Threshold or Anaerobic Threshold. This is the HR they can sustain for the last 20 minutes of an all-out 30 minute ride."

How you translated this into my suggesting that this was how to determine Max HR, I cannot fathom. :)
 

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Len J said:
is when I am going flat out up a hill chasing someone either in front of me or off my wheel.....trust me, this has nothing to do with flapping jerseys. It's also about 12% above my measured LT which is about right.

I've read about this flapping jersy/high HR issue...I've never had this problem & I wear everything from tight to loose jerseys......I would recommend 2 solutions, tighten the strap & make sure it is just below your pecs with the strap in back higher &, make sure you wet the contact portion of the strap before you put it on.......20 years of wearing a HRM and never had a problem.

Len
Len...

I've got a max of 208 (2x stress tests), but have seen mine hit 220's before...arrythmia! I've gotten them a few times from sudden stops after hard efforts. No big deal, just cough and it stops....

If you see 200+ often, check your pulse when it happens. I've personally never seen a jersey cause a HRM malfunction....

The Flash
 

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I wasn't talking about you........

Kerry Irons said:
So, Len, this is what I posted: "People should be worried about their MSS (max steady state) HR, which is essentially their Lactate Threshold or Anaerobic Threshold. This is the HR they can sustain for the last 20 minutes of an all-out 30 minute ride."

How you translated this into my suggesting that this was how to determine Max HR, I cannot fathom. :)
Rather, I was tlaking about A quote further up in the thread......speaking of reading comprehension :) .

Len
 
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