Road Bike, Cycling Forums banner
1 - 4 of 4 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
1 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Hi all,

I get to buy myself a new bike! I just have no idea what to get. I think I will primarily be riding around town (suburban), and on converted right-of-way bike paths, sometimes with my 4 year old son and sometimes alone. I am currently in average physical shape, but would like to use the bike for cardio training 1x to 3x a week.

So, do I get a "road bike" or a "hybrid"? Do I get a "mountain bike" (i live in an area with lots of trails) and switch tires? Should I get a "ladies' bike"? Please suggest brands, specific parts, etc. I am using store credit to buy this new bike, so I am limited to whatever they carry.

I am 5'4", 150 lbs, if that matters for bike fit.

I don't want to spend more than $800, maybe $1k tops (which seems like an amount that should get a very good bike!).

Some add'l info:
I have an almost 15 year old Specialized road bike that was "custom built" for me, a gift from my husband. It has maybe 500 miles on it! The problem is that it hurts my lady bits something awful to ride. I've had it adjusted by the shop that built it, and new butterfly seat(s), but no improvement. I don't really know why the bike hurts (too big?) (too long?), and I really, really, really want to be sure that I don't blow a bundle on another dog of a bike.

Thanks!

EDIT: Thanks for the responses so far.

From their website listing, the LBS carries Gary Fisher, Marin, Lemond, Specialized S-Works, Bianchi, Litespeed, Felt, Electra, Santa Cruz, Titus.

I had a great bike in college, when hybrids were new, and I NEVER had any discomfort whatsoever, so I am thinking to go in the sitting upright position (so a hybrid?) is the better way to go. Alas, that bike was stolen, and the fancy Specialized was meant to replace it.

I do wear padded ladies biking shorts, I've even tried wearing two pairs at a time. The pain/discomfort I think is truly from having too much of my body/weight resting on too tender and too small a part of the body not meant to carry that kind of load. I think the bike tubes are too far or something, and pushing me and center of gravity too far back.
 

·
Cycling induced anoesis
Joined
·
13,006 Posts
sfoanna said:
Hi all,

I get to buy myself a new bike! I just have no idea what to get. I think I will primarily be riding around town (suburban), and on converted right-of-way bike paths, sometimes with my 4 year old son and sometimes alone. I am currently in average physical shape, but would like to use the bike for cardio training 1x to 3x a week.

So, do I get a "road bike" or a "hybrid"? Do I get a "mountain bike" (i live in an area with lots of trails) and switch tires? Should I get a "ladies' bike"? Please suggest brands, specific parts, etc. I am using store credit to buy this new bike, so I am limited to whatever they carry.

I am 5'4", 150 lbs, if that matters for bike fit.

I don't want to spend more than $800, maybe $1k tops (which seems like an amount that should get a very good bike!).

Some add'l info:
I have an almost 15 year old Specialized road bike that was "custom built" for me, a gift from my husband. It has maybe 500 miles on it! The problem is that it hurts my lady bits something awful to ride. I've had it adjusted by the shop that built it, and new butterfly seat(s), but no improvement. I don't really know why the bike hurts (too big?) (too long?), and I really, really, really want to be sure that I don't blow a bundle on another dog of a bike.

Thanks!
I would tell anyone this, but because you're experiencing discomfort it's especially important for you to get fitted for whatever bike you decide on. I'm assuming (and hopeful) that your store credit is at a LBS and they have certified (or at least experienced) fitters available. As you are learning, fit matters most.

Regarding bike choices. Seeing as you've decided to stay primarily on the road, I'd go with either a hybrid or road bike. With the hybrid, if you so desire, you could venture offroad with a change of tires and it'll be more efficient (when on the road) than a mtn bike. If you go that route, consider one with a suspension fork (for those off road excursions).

Back to fit (sorta). I'd suggest at least looking into a woman's specific bike, again because of the issues you've mentioned. A knowledgeable bike shop can guide you with this decision. Also, you don't mention your attire when riding, but if you aren't wearing cycling specific shorts, I'd strongly recommend investing in a couple of pairs of good quality, padded shorts. They'll go a long way in keeping you comfortable.

Lastly, you ask for specific recommendations re: brands, but don't provide brands that are available at the store where you have credit. Please help us help you. :)
 

·
Resident Curmudgeon
Joined
·
11,980 Posts
I agree with PJ352. Regarding your pain, especially in the seat dept., you need to know that buying / liking a saddle is a very personal choice for men and women. If you have a friend that rides and recommends a saddle, please realize that you might hate it. Many bike shops will let you try a saddle for up to a week, then exchange it if you don't like it.
Those wide cushy seats with lots of padding are not the answer. After a few miles the padding will have compressed, and the width of the seat will start to chafe your inner thighs.

Another side of the saddle equation is you. With any saddle you choose there's a (ahem) getting to know you period. Like any exercise, there will be some discomfort until you "toughen up a bit."

As far as the bike itself is concerned, we need some more info on how you plan to use it. Will you be racing, touring, long rides, short neighborhood rides, pavement, dirt, group rides? How often will you be riding; daily, a few times per week, once per month?

Sorry I can't help you more right now, but hopefully you got something.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
34 Posts
In order Hybrid, moutain bike then road bike.
In terms of what you are describing the hybrid would be the best, unless you really really plan on doing the majority of rides on the trails,with trailsbeing winding dirt paths. People who I know that have purchased hybrids have been really pleased with them. You mentioned riding with your son. I am not sure if that mean pulling him with a trailer or him riding solo on a bike (given the age I am guessing trailer, but I've been wrong before). If you will be pulling him on a trailer make sure the LBS knows this ahead of time as they could make minor bike changes if necessary.
 
1 - 4 of 4 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top