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Engineer
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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Everyone seems to have their own ideas on what pressures run best on their road bikes. I'm curious to know what sort of pressures other riders are running, based on their weight and such. I know different surfaces make differences, so base it off of your general road rides.

Where do you find to be you optimum pressure for your weight and bike weight, as well as the size tire that you use on your tube or tubeless setup?
 

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I weigh about 160.

Road with 23mm clinchers: 116 psi

Single speed cross with 32mm clinchers: 85 psi

Gravel bike with tubeless 36mm clinchers: 45 psi

Fat bike with tubeless 4.75 x 26 setup: 15 psi for smooth trails, 10 psi for technical trails, 7.5 psi (or lower) for snow
 

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With 25mm tires I was 85F/95R I weigh 185. Now it's 90F/95R because the new wheels recommend 90 minimum pressure.
 

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Second that this really belongs in wheels/tires.

I weigh 190 and run 25mm tires at 70/110psi front/rear. Secure, fast, and plush - pick all three. I'm going to move to 28mm if my frame permits.

Is there a reason why manufacturers specify minimum psi, other than legal CYA?

BTW, for a strange experience, check out the tire pressure app on the Vittoria web site. Apparently, width of a road tire does not matter to psi. Who knew? :wink5:
 

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700 x 25mm

90 psi on front
100 psi on back

I'm 165 lbs... bike + accessories are anywhere from 20-25 pounds, depending on ride.

On my mountain bike (29 x 2.25)... I ride with 40 psi on front and rear. People think I'm nuts. :) 40 psi is considered blasphemy and way too high of a pressure for status quo mountain bikers.
 

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150 lbs, 23 mm tires...start at 90 f / 100 r, ride for 3 days and air back up.
 

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I weigh 175. 85f & 95r on 19mm rims with Veloflex Master 25mm (actual 24mm) 320 tpi. 80f & 90r on 23mm rims with Veloflex Master 25mm (actual 25mm) 320 tpi. I've found higher thread count tires can be run at higher pressures without loss of comfort.
 

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I (currently) weigh in at about 198. I run 25mm tires. Once a week I pump them to 90f/100R. It is a little harsh day one, but the rest of the week is pretty smooth.
 

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Forever a Student
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28-30mm external rim width
19.5mm internal bead seat
25mm Cont. GP4KSII tires
140lb rider
60-65psi front
80-85psi rear
 

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I'm a 200+ lb rider

Road:
Conti 4 Season 25mm on HED Belgium C2
80f/90r

Gravel:
36mm Clement XPLOR MSO Tubeless on HED Belgium C2+
45f/55r

Commuter/Lunch Bike:

35mm Compass Bon Jon Pass tires on a generic FSA Cross rim (not sure on specs, but they are wiiiiiiiide).
50f/60r

And for me, that tire pressure calculator doesn't really work. I successfully run much lower pressure than it recommends, especially on the rear.
 

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Never Give Up!
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I used to run my 23C tires at full psi (what ever was printed on the side of the tires), until lately... after reading a few post here on RBR. Been playing around and currently running the front tire at 80psi and the rear at 90psi... I like the feel, more comfortable than running full psi.

I'm thinking of lower the front to 75 and the rear to 85, I currently weigh 134lbs and riding a full carbon saddle - no padding :thumbsup:
 

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190lbs on 28mm, I run them @ 75 front and rear more or less. Unlike my mtb where I sweat over 2 psi, I play around with it on the road bike. Sometimes 65 front/70 rear, 70 front/75 rear, sometimes even. Honestly, with 28's there's a pretty big range where you can keep a comfy ride without descending into mushy sidewalls or feeling like you're dragging. Higher pressures just make them harsher, not faster.
 

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You people are freaking me out with these front/rear differences. :confused:
There's more weight and pressure on the rear, it should have more air.
Putting the front at the same psi as the rear is just making your ride harsher and less comfortable than it should be.

In order for both tires to deflect at the same percentage the rear needs a higher psi, somewhere around 15% higher seems to be accepted as usual.
 
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