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Engineer
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3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I accidentally posted this in General, and didn't get good responses, go figure. However, Everyone seems to have their own ideas on what pressures run best on their road bikes. I know that there are a bunch of different charts and theories. I'm not interested in those because they all differ. I'm more curious to know what sort of pressures other riders are actually running, based on their weight and such. I know different surfaces make differences, so base it off of your general road rides.

Where do you find to be you optimum pressure for your weight and bike weight, as well as the size tire that you use on your tubed or tubeless setup?
 

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A wheelist
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11,324 Posts
Tubed. Vittoria Open Corsa 25mm. 175lbs. 80f/90r - re-pumped about 1x per week so the pressures get down to about 70/80. And that's ok with me.

Edit - if I re-pumped every ride (and I'm too lazy for that) I'd use 70f/80r.
 

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Banned Sock Puppet
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14,452 Posts
Tubed Maxxis Re-Fuse 700x28c. Total weight of clothed rider, bike and all I carry is around 200lbs. I run 70PSI front / 100PSI rear. If I did get to 60/90 that would be fine. My position is more upright hence the greater disparity between front and rear. I also find front vibrations more annoying than rear vibrations - my arse is tougher than my hands.

I do re-pump before each ride, but not because I'm not lazy. I'm just as lazy as Mike. :D The reason I pump before each ride is in the chance there is a leak, I will notice it then.
 

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'brifter' is f'ing stupid
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15,567 Posts
175 lbs. Fairly aggressive, low-ish bars. 25mm tires 75/85. 28mm tires 60/70. 32mm slicks on cx bike 45/55.
 

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Banned Sock Puppet
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14,452 Posts
I'm not so lazy that I don't do the ol' thumb test before each ride. I do have a well calibrated thumb.
My tactile judgment isn't that good unless the tire is WAY low on air as in under 40PSI.
 

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Registered
Joined
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760 Posts
83kg
on the road bike, around 75/85 on 25mm Vittoria Open Corsa CX iii
on the Gravel bike, around 65/75 on the 28mm Roubaix Pro slicks and 45/55 on a variety of 33mm open tubular CX tyres.
 

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Banned Sock Puppet
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14,452 Posts
Mine is legendary and calibrated to "yep that's good enough" tolerances.
What can I say? Compared to your decades of experience, I'm just a rank amateur with a paltry 15 years experience. :D

I use a torque wrench too.
 

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Fat & Single
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205 Posts
83kg,
Road - 80psi f/r with 25c tubeless Pro Ones on Hed wheels.
CX - 45psi f/r with 32c Vittoria XG tubeless on Enve wheels.
 

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Premium Member
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2,714 Posts
@the average Joe

You will get data that reflects what folks have found to be acceptable for them. Some have found it going through the process of experimentation, some found it because they were told so, tried it, found it ok and did not bother to look further. However, because it works for them it does not necessarily mean it will work for you. Some of these guys have taken the tire pressure down to where they start getting pinch flats and then raised a bit above that point. Because they don't get pinch flats it does not assure you that you won't regardless if you happen to be at the same weight and also hit the exact identical pothole. Point here is that their riding style may be totally different than yours.

There is no such a thing as an optimum pressure based solely on the weight the tires carry or even the type of tire used. My suggestion to you if you truly want to analyze your options is to start with the output from a calculator like this Bicycle tire pressure calculator for the weight distribution you have on the bike and adjust lower from there in 5 psi increments (increasing comfort AND rolling resistance) until you start having pinch flats at which point raise it 2-5 psi and you are done. You need to do this for all situations you want to optimize your tires for. In other words, a set of wheels meant for climbing or sprinting would have different pressures and different pressure difference between front and rear than a set of wheels on a more upright stance bike used for a leisurely ride. That is if you want to be exhaustively anal about it being an engineer et all. However, at the end of the day, finding the right pressure for your person, desired performance and specific circumstance is both science and art. Enjoy the journey.
 

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Engineer
Joined
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3 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
@the average Joe

You will get data that reflects what folks have found to be acceptable for them. Some have found it going through the process of experimentation, some found it because they were told so, tried it, found it ok and did not bother to look further. However, because it works for them it does not necessarily mean it will work for you. Some of these guys have taken the tire pressure down to where they start getting pinch flats and then raised a bit above that point. Because they don't get pinch flats it does not assure you that you won't regardless if you happen to be at the same weight and also hit the exact identical pothole. Point here is that their riding style may be totally different than yours.

There is no such a thing as an optimum pressure based solely on the weight the tires carry or even the type of tire used. My suggestion to you if you truly want to analyze your options is to start with the output from a calculator like this Bicycle tire pressure calculator for the weight distribution you have on the bike and adjust lower from there in 5 psi increments (increasing comfort AND rolling resistance) until you start having pinch flats at which point raise it 2-5 psi and you are done. You need to do this for all situations you want to optimize your tires for. In other words, a set of wheels meant for climbing or sprinting would have different pressures and different pressure difference between front and rear than a set of wheels on a more upright stance bike used for a leisurely ride. That is if you want to be exhaustively anal about it being an engineer et all. However, at the end of the day, finding the right pressure for your person, desired performance and specific circumstance is both science and art. Enjoy the journey.
I personally understand it, and I thank you for your input. However, this isn't for the purpose of me finding my own personal, perfectly engineered, crazy optimal pressure. As a BC tire engineer, I am attempting to normalize a standard of pressure usage. As you may know, standards are pretty much non-existent in the BC industry. So any attempt to collect a little, crappy, "real" data, is a Godsend. So I am looking for data that is based personally on them, and their preferences, because in the end, that is what the tire should be made for.
 
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