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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I used the stock toe clips last season and figure its time for cycling shoes and pedals and wondering what is recommended or what to avoid,, also is buying used to save money okay if I clean them and disenfect them real well?

I have a 2k6 allez and need something nice but not crazy expensive,, I do plan on upgrading my bike next winter for the following spring and with the money I plan on spending buying a whole new set of shes and pedals wouldn't be a problem so what I buy now doesnt need to be an investment.

I need a seat too if theres a popular model LMK!

thanks for any info, T
 

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For shoes - don't be a cheapskate. Go to some shops and try some shoes on. IME, the good ones retail for over $100. Doesn't mean you can't get 'em on sale or whatever. Some brands I like are Shimano, Sidi and Specialized. That doesn't mean that other brands aren't perfectly good. Those are just the ones I've liked. I like to use a supportive insole. It's about a $30 part that makes a big difference in my comfort, and in some shoes I also use shims to correct some biomechanical weirdness I have.

There are holy wars about road shoes and mountain shoes. I think mountain bike racing shoes have all the major advantages of road shoes, so unless there's a specific road pedal system you're trying to maintain compatibility with, just do MTB shoes. Note that casual/commuter shoes are sometimes too flexy to be comfortable on long rides, and flat pedal MTB shoes are as different as one can get and still have it be a shoe for a person on a bike. I think buckles are a nice feature on cycling shoes.

Shimano SPD pedals are pretty popular if you do MTB shoes. If you do road shoes, LOOK, Speedplay and SPD-SL are all pretty popular.

I don't know why you'd get new shoes next year. Buy 'em like you mean it the first time. If you're keeping both bikes, fine, get more pedals. I have a couple sets of the same road pedals myself.

There are many popular saddles. Your butt is as individual as your feet. Go to a shop that has demo saddles and try their demo saddles. Or, go to a shop with a really liberal exchange policy and try some saddles. Make sure to be really nice to the saddles until you're sure you'll keep them. I wrapped the rails on one in electrical tape on a tip from the sales guy. I was able to return it for full credit when I found I didn't like it, so I was glad for the advice.
 

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Get a saddle with a cutout. Research is conclusive that it provides better circulation and reduces risks for urogenital disorders in men and women.

I really like my Selle SMP Evolution. They make saddles specific to the width of your ischial tuberosity, so you could measure yourself and get a "tailored" fit saddle. I believe Specialized also does this with their saddles. They ARE pricey though, but totally worth it. I've ridden 90 miles straight mostly seated without ever thinking about how my butt felt. If you consider the cost of a doctor's visit, the price of a perfect fitting saddle doesn't sound as bad. lol

It's hard to give a recommendation on shoes. You really just want to make sure the shoe isn't compressing the forefoot too much, but also gives you enough support. You want the shoe to be snug, but not too tight.

If you go with Look pedals, I recommend starting with the grey cleats. It has a reasonable amount of float.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
thanks for the quick replys, I found something on YT where the guy sits on cardboard and then measures the dimples in the cardboard from center to center for the correct width seat so I'll try that,, but the cut out idea is cool. ya know someone told me that no matter what seat I by where I'm new It still will not feel right so I need to take that into consideration.

thanks T
 

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Get a saddle with a cutout. Research is conclusive that it provides better circulation and reduces risks for urogenital disorders in men and women.

I really like my Selle SMP Evolution. They make saddles specific to the width of your ischial tuberosity, so you could measure yourself and get a "tailored" fit saddle. I believe Specialized also does this with their saddles. They ARE pricey though, but totally worth it. I've ridden 90 miles straight mostly seated without ever thinking about how my butt felt. If you consider the cost of a doctor's visit, the price of a perfect fitting saddle doesn't sound as bad. lol

It's hard to give a recommendation on shoes. You really just want to make sure the shoe isn't compressing the forefoot too much, but also gives you enough support. You want the shoe to be snug, but not too tight.

If you go with Look pedals, I recommend starting with the grey cleats. It has a reasonable amount of float.
i'd think that saddles would be even more of a 'personal fit' choice than shoes. i find it amazing that you think everyone should use a saddle w/ a cutout.
 

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Well, I'll add my two cents here, since I am still going through some adjustments...

Shoes: I read reviews, and Lake's cx401 with speedplay cleats was probably the best comfort/eyecandy. Custom molded shoes, memory foam... can't complain (look for them on Nashbar, when they are on sale $199)

Saddle: currently running a Fizik Arione.... gonna try a Fizik Kurve Chameleon... you should look into what will fit you best, if you don't know, its trial and error. Selle makes awesome saddles, I just find them a bit unconventional for my riding style. Keep in mind that your shorts/bibs have a chamois... there is a plethora of different ones to choose out there. I have Sugoi, and like them, but will probably try Castelli for my next bibs, or maybe Desoto, since they get rave reviews.

Pedals, once again, a personal choice... Speedplays are good, but, as with everything, there are Pro's and Cons...
Please be advised that you will eventually look at your cockpit, and will want that to be comfortable also.
With everything I've been through, to me its about comfort and functionality over looks.
 

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I'll second the "don't cheap out on shoes" advice. A new (or upgraded) bike doesn't necessarily mean you'll need new shoes.

Just curious.. why do you "need" a new saddle? And, if you shop for one, don't just consider sit bone size for determining fit/ comfort. That measurement only tells part of the story, with other dimensions, contours/ shape and padding also playing a role. Your position on the bike (more upright/ more aero) will also dictate which saddle shape works best. Lots to consider here, and usually lots of trial and error.

Re: mtb versus road shoes, consider the importance of ease of walking. If it matters to you, the recessed cleats offered on mtb shoes may be to your liking. Conversely, if you plan on minimal walking, I think a road shoe with slightly larger cleat area offers some advantage.

Lastly, an important aspect of saddle comfort is proper bike fit, so if you haven't already had one done, I suggest opting for a standard LBS fitting. Since cleat set up is an integral part of a bike fit, if you decide on a pedal system at the same time, the fitter can include that step in your fitting.
 

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i really like my spd shoes - We get to our destination and I'm off the bike and the first one at the bar while everyone else is putting their little covers on their shoes! If you have any walking highly recommend spd - just like PJ352 said above.
 

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Get a saddle with a cutout. Research is conclusive that it provides better circulation and reduces risks for urogenital disorders in men and women.
Nope. The research by the guys who make cutout saddles is conclusive that the marketing department says . . . .

There are saddles that work well for one person and are a total pain for the next. There are people who are comfortable on just about any saddle and people who never seem to get comfortable.
 

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i really like my spd shoes - We get to our destination and I'm off the bike and the first one at the bar while everyone else is putting their little covers on their shoes! If you have any walking highly recommend spd - just like PJ352 said above.
You must be in a big hurry to get to that bar; It takes me about 5 seconds to put the covers on.

That said, a mtb shoe with a recessed cleat is better than a stiff-soled road shoe with an external cleat (even with cover) if you're going to do much walking. So it's a valid point for some people.
 

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Lots of good advice here, the items you are talking about are two of the three contact points on the bike(bars are the other) and as such are highly personal. What works for me may not for you and vice versa. Shoes are one area that I would not go cheap on as they last a long time and your feet do not change much. I would also suggest you consider a bike fit as you are looking at changing several related things at the same time and if done incorrectly setting up your cleats on your shoes can lead to injury.

For shoes and saddle I think it is best to try for yourself to see what works (fitters usually have several saddles for you to try). For pedals it comes down to road vs mountain style. Road pedals tend to have larger platform area which tends to provide better power transfer and for me less hotspots on my feet due to spreading out the force over a larger area. For me, this makes a big difference as the rides get longer. Road pedals have larger cleats which can make walking more difficult. Mountain pedals typically have smaller cleats which are recessed into the sole of the shoe which makes walking much easier, however they can create hotspots as the force is placed over a smaller area. For me not a big deal on rides under two hours or with lots of stops.

I use both depending on the type of riding I am doing, commuting/errands mountain
Everything else road. It may be helpful to decide which type road or mountain pedal system you will be using as that could influence your shoe choice as not all shoes are compatible with road and mountain pedals.

Once you get your pedals installed, I would also suggest you practice getting into and out of them on a trainer (LBS/Fitter/your own/borrow) as getting used to them can take sometime, then ride in a grassy area practicing as you will probably fall once or twice and grass is much softer than cement.


Finally since you stated that you are looking to upgrade your bike in a year or so a fit might also provide you with some perspective on what to look for in your new ride and info on proper sizing. Have fun and good luck!
 

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For shoes - don't be a cheapskate. Go to some shops and try some shoes on. IME, the good ones retail for over $100. Doesn't mean you can't get 'em on sale or whatever. Some brands I like are Shimano, Sidi and Specialized. That doesn't mean that other brands aren't perfectly good. Those are just the ones I've liked. I like to use a supportive insole. It's about a $30 part that makes a big difference in my comfort, and in some shoes I also use shims to correct some biomechanical weirdness I have.

There are holy wars about road shoes and mountain shoes. I think mountain bike racing shoes have all the major advantages of road shoes, so unless there's a specific road pedal system you're trying to maintain compatibility with, just do MTB shoes. Note that casual/commuter shoes are sometimes too flexy to be comfortable on long rides, and flat pedal MTB shoes are as different as one can get and still have it be a shoe for a person on a bike. I think buckles are a nice feature on cycling shoes.

Shimano SPD pedals are pretty popular if you do MTB shoes. If you do road shoes, LOOK, Speedplay and SPD-SL are all pretty popular.

I don't know why you'd get new shoes next year. Buy 'em like you mean it the first time. If you're keeping both bikes, fine, get more pedals. I have a couple sets of the same road pedals myself.

There are many popular saddles. Your butt is as individual as your feet. Go to a shop that has demo saddles and try their demo saddles. Or, go to a shop with a really liberal exchange policy and try some saddles. Make sure to be really nice to the saddles until you're sure you'll keep them. I wrapped the rails on one in electrical tape on a tip from the sales guy. I was able to return it for full credit when I found I didn't like it, so I was glad for the advice.
Good article. Thanks for sharing.
 

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I just up graded from SPD shoes to SPD-SL road shoes - and the shoe difference is huge, they feel much more secure and efficient, no pressure points on the bottom of the foot on long rides. Of course the road shoes have very stiff carbon sole, and the mountain bike shoes did not. If I did much getting off the bike and walking around I would definitely go with an SPD Road shoe with a stiff cabon sole, not SPD-SL, they are sooooo much more comfortable walking around in. I just don't do much walking, I ride, may stop every couple hours for a break on long rides but then I am just standing not walking. The pedals I used were A600 Shimanos, very light and easy to use IMHO. Now using Shimano Durace - not nearly as easy to use, you can't keep your feet on the pedals when clipped out so it takes some more getting used to - not a problem once you get used to them but there is a bit of a learning curve. Not as easy to clip into either.

You can get some great deals on shoes if you wait for sales and know what you want including sizing. This winter I picked up my roadbike shoes (SHR170s) for $99 shipped from Competitive Cyclist (normally $199). I wasn't sure on teh size so ordered 3 pair, kept the ones that fit and returned the other 2 pair with free shipping.
 
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