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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Went to a shop and test drove a Cannondale Synapse Carbon. I bought the bike, and was fitted for it. I rode it a few times during the fitting, went through the gears, checked brakes, etc; and all was working well.
After the transaction was done and it was mine, I was told the bike needed to go through an "Exit Tuning" to make sure everything was good on the bike. Not thinking much of it, a few minutes later I get the bike back, and bring it home.
On my very first ride, not a 1/2 mile, I am going up a hill, downshift, the chain gets wedged between the rear gear cog and spokes, and I go down in a traffic lane. Fortunately there was no traffic coming. That stretch of road has no shoulder and the speed limit is 55 MPH, but it is the only way in or out of my neighborhood.
I ruined a jersey, bib shorts, scratched the pedal, the derailleur, scuffed the edge of the seat, and have a flat spot on the rear tire. I called the shop that sold me the bike, said they would look at it and see if it something they can adjust, but did not offer anything else.
If this were 100 miles down the road, I would not expect much, but this is a new bike. I have to take it in to get the chain removed from it's wedged position, but I would think they should step up and replaced anything that's damaged. Am I wrong?
 

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Cycling induced anoesis
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Went to a shop and test drove a Cannondale Synapse Carbon....

On my very first ride, not a 1/2 mile, I am going up a hill, downshift, the chain gets wedged between the rear gear cog and spokes, and I go down in a traffic lane....

I ruined a jersey, bib shorts, scratched the pedal, the derailleur, scuffed the edge of the seat, and have a flat spot on the rear tire. I called the shop that sold me the bike, said they would look at it and see if it something they can adjust, but did not offer anything else.
If this were 100 miles down the road, I would not expect much, but this is a new bike. I have to take it in to get the chain removed from it's wedged position, but I would think they should step up and replaced anything that's damaged. Am I wrong?
I suspect opinions are going to run the gamut on this one, but FWIW, I think your expectations (taken literally) are a little too high.

That's not to say the LBS shouldn't make this right, but what constitutes 'right' beyond adjusting your RD (L-limit screw) is what's up for discussion, IMO.

I would say that (beyond any drivetrain adjustments), the LBS should offer an apology, discuss the mishap with the mechanic doing the "exit tuning" (and explain to you why it occurred) and consider offering a store credit/ gift card - the amount of which would also be up for discussion.

Scrapes/ scratches will inevitably happen anyway (albeit, generally with more use), but I do think the shop should replace the rear tire if it is, in fact, damaged in a way that affects performance/ function.

Basically, I think the LBS should make a good faith effort to make this right with you, but judging from your post, I think you have to (try to) be objective and temper your expectations some.

Lastly, consider learning how to maintain your bike. Mishaps can still occur, but then you'll have only one person to blame - and you'll surely learn from the experience!
 

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If there's absolutely no doubt that the chain wedged itself between the largest rear cog and spokes and there was no foreign object off the road (stick, rock) involved, I would indeed lay the blame on the shop and ask for some form of consideration.

Before any bike I work on leaves the shop, I shift the chain to the largest cog and continue to turn the pedals while pushing against the derailleur body with my thumb as hard as I can. If I even hear the slightest attempt by the chain to shift towards the spokes, I turn the limit screw in until I can no longer hear that. Then I turn it in a bit more so that it takes just a little extra effort at the shifter to shift the chain onto the largest cog.

Since we remove the spoke protector on new high-end bikes, it's absolutely imperative that this thumb-test is done on every new bike before it leaves the shop.
 

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The spoke protector is key here. I have not heard of a shop removing the spoke protector on a bike, that is something typically done by the user. If the user removed the spoke protector then this is pretty much on him. If it never came with one or was removed by the shop that changes things some. I removed mine, but also thoroughly test it when adjusting the rear derailleur to be sure it won't throw into the wheel.

If everything is exactly as the OP says, and the disk was taken off by the shop, they obviously have some skin in this game. It seems bizarre that they would so badly adjust the derailleur that way though. How as the bike taken home? Is it possible the hanger/derailleur was damaged or knocked out of alignment? It also seems strange that within the first half mile of a ride the OP was pedaling hard enough while shifting all the way through the gears so as to throw the chain off the cassette, into the wheel, and lock the tire up with a bald spot, and spill. Seems you would need some speed to do that, which does not make sense for the gearing. I am not saying the OP is incorrect, everything he typed may be accurate. But if I am a shop owner these are the things I am thinking before I just start shelling out cash.

As for what to expect, making the OP whole including clothing and such is unlikely. Readjusting certainly, and probably even some basic repairs such as the chain, cassette, tire, etc. Clothing no. Scratched components, no. Replace what no longer works, adjust what does, and go about your lives.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
There was no spoke protector on the bike, not sure why, but it is not there. Should I have them put one on there?
As for the tire, it is not bald, just has a flat spot from locking up when the chain went from the sprocket to the area between the cogs and the spokes. I was downshifting from one of the center gears to the next one down when the chain slipped and just wedged itself there. My bike was transported on a one up usa rack, which does not touch the derailleur. It is stored on a stand that also does not touch it. I have never had a bent derailleur before, and am upgrading form a 2 year old Bianchi steel road bike, which has been transported and stored the same way. The derailleur is bent now as I went down on that side.
 

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Doesn't sound like the the derailleur just overshot the shift and went into the gear from that description. That would be a simple H/L limit adjustment issue. This sounds like the entire chain jumped. May be a defect issue. Can you describe the situation in more detail, shifting to bigger cog or smaller, up hill or down, etc? Curious about this now.
 

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The most important thing is that you were not seriously injured. Agree with the spoke protector, I have had shops remove them before but only after consulting with me first. I do all my own mechanic work and unless some foreign object was involved the L limit screw on the RD seems the issue. The best I think you can hope for is an inspecton to determine what caused the problem and adjustment to put back into proper working order. After that, if the shop owner values your business he might offer a gift card/coupon. You might be able to see if they have a saddle you could swap as shops often have take- offs. Finally, depending on the extent of the damage lycra/spandex can be repaired so maybe not a total loss.

The point a previous poster made about getting the bike home is important, I have spent alot of time around shops where people buy bikes and have no idea how they will get them home. Trying to wrestle a bike into a back seat could easily knock something out of alignment. Not saying you did but must consider all options.
 

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it's highly doubtful the actual derailleur is bent, it's much more likely just the hanger. it's entirely possible that the mechanic that built the bike didn't adjust the derailleur properly and also that the mechanic that did the 'exit' check didn't catch the mistake. i see bikes every week that were 'recently tuned' and are a complete mess.

there are a LOT of bad mechanics making a living screwing up bikes because they don't know what they're doing.

if you transported the bike on the rack like you said, and there is NO WAY that it fell over, was bumped into, then i'd say the shop is at fault. the bike should leave the store in a perfect state of tune. if the derailleur is badly scraped up, i'd offer to replace it for you. i can't imagine the tire getting flat spotted at 10mph, so i'd have to look at that. and you really ruined the clothing you had on too? i guess it could happen, but not likely. i'd go back to the shop and have a talk w/ them about it. definitely don't go in w/ a bad attitude, but also make sure they explain everything to you fully. from what i've read, there is no excuse for this happening.
on the other hand, it's impossible for anyone (other than you) to know for sure what happened to the bike once it left the shop.
 

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Doesn't sound like the the derailleur just overshot the shift and went into the gear from that description. That would be a simple H/L limit adjustment issue. This sounds like the entire chain jumped. May be a defect issue. Can you describe the situation in more detail, shifting to bigger cog or smaller, up hill or down, etc? Curious about this now.
Agree I was typing my first post when his follow up came in. Wondering if shifting under heavy load, as think OP mentioned going up hill?
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
The lycra/spandex took the brunt of the asphalt impact. I have minor scrapes, my pride took a beating, but the shorts are toast by my hip where I slid, and the jersey suffered some snag tearing from the asphalt. I was riding on flat ground and started up a 7% grade. I was probably doing about 20 when I started up and started the downshift as the it is a steep climb. This is my first compact, so this was a test run up to see how different it is on a climb. The chain jumped, not sure why, but hope I never have to experience it again. I also found I hate walking any distance in road shoes.
 

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Cycling induced anoesis
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I was downshifting from one of the center gears to the next one down when the chain slipped and just wedged itself there.
Of everything you've offered thus far, I think the above statement is key. I'm not suggesting that the limit screw can't still be the issue, but your wording casts doubt (in my mind) that a maladjusted RD is the sole cause of your mishap.

Things like this happen quick. I've hit objects in the road and been by them before I knew it. Not saying this is the case here, but may be worth considering.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thank you for the responses, never had anything like this happen before. I took it to a local shop and they looked at it, first question was why I took off the spoke guard, and second was could I leave it as they need to disassemble the rear to get the chain out. They said the derailleur does not look bent and to show the other shop that if you shift into the lowest gear the derailleur puts the chain between the spokes and the gear, so they need to adjust it so it will work right. They also told me they should replace the seat as it is coming apart at the scrape, and I should press them for a discount on a replacement jersey and bib. Good thing is, they took pictures and gave me an estimate, they said if the other shop wants to charge me for the fixes to bring it back and they will get in touch with the Cannondale Rep. At least now I know what caused it, now to drive an hour to the selling shop to get it fixed.
 

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If there's absolutely no doubt that the chain wedged itself between the largest rear cog and spokes and there was no foreign object off the road (stick, rock) involved, I would indeed lay the blame on the shop and ask for some form of consideration.

Before any bike I work on leaves the shop, I shift the chain to the largest cog and continue to turn the pedals while pushing against the derailleur body with my thumb as hard as I can. If I even hear the slightest attempt by the chain to shift towards the spokes, I turn the limit screw in until I can no longer hear that. Then I turn it in a bit more so that it takes just a little extra effort at the shifter to shift the chain onto the largest cog.

Since we remove the spoke protector on new high-end bikes, it's absolutely imperative that this thumb-test is done on every new bike before it leaves the shop.
That's exactly how I do it and it's pictured and described on my Wheels page. Then, only a stick jammed in the chain or a bent derailer hanger will send the chain over the top.
 

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Thank you for the responses, never had anything like this happen before. I took it to a local shop and they looked at it, first question was why I took off the spoke guard, and second was could I leave it as they need to disassemble the rear to get the chain out. They said the derailleur does not look bent and to show the other shop that if you shift into the lowest gear the derailleur puts the chain between the spokes and the gear, so they need to adjust it so it will work right. They also told me they should replace the seat as it is coming apart at the scrape, and I should press them for a discount on a replacement jersey and bib. Good thing is, they took pictures and gave me an estimate, they said if the other shop wants to charge me for the fixes to bring it back and they will get in touch with the Cannondale Rep. At least now I know what caused it, now to drive an hour to the selling shop to get it fixed.
At least now you know for sure, sounds like the second shop should be your first.
 

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At least now you know for sure, sounds like the second shop should be your first.
Yup. Sounds like the selling shop messed up. Of course, the shop that's not actually involved is telling you what their competitor should do to make things right. So, not exactly an objective opinion.

I do, however, give the second shop credit for offering to step up and contact the C'dale rep. Might want to suggest the same to the selling shop. Could result in a better remedy - like a new saddle.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Was able to get out of the office early. Took it in and they said a pin was missing, and the cassette was out of adjustment. I am not sure what the pin does, and they could not really explain it to me other than "You have to have a pin". They replaced the chain, and the cassette. They would not replace the seat as in their opinion I would eventually scrape it up anyway, "most people do". I explained my 2 year old Bianchi does not have scrapes on the seat, but it fell on deaf ears. I will probably end up replacing the seat anyway, stock seats are ok, but at the price point I was shopping at they are not top of the line seats. I just wish they would have cleaned up the grease marks from the mechanics, but at least it is fixed. Now to see if it will go 50 miles tomorrow.
 

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what pin are they talking about on the cassette?

The other part that strikes me as odd is an "exit tuning"..... the LBS doesn't tune the bike when they take it out of the box and do the remaining approx 10% of the assembly? Maybe they are a high volume store that they don't have time to do it when they do the final assembly....

Maybe you should call Cannondale about the first shop.... and then do business from now on with the second shop. In your position... I'd be pissed too.
 

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Cycling induced anoesis
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Was able to get out of the office early. Took it in and they said a pin was missing, and the cassette was out of adjustment. I am not sure what the pin does, and they could not really explain it to me other than "You have to have a pin". They replaced the chain, and the cassette.
That's odd. I've been working on my bikes for ~22 years now and the only pins I'm aware of are on a chain. With one missing, I'd doubt you'd have gotten anywhere. More likely, the chain was damaged when it overshot and wedged between the spokes and cassette cog.

Cassette 'out of adjustment'? How? They're either installed correctly and tightened down or they aren't.

I think there's a level of BS at play here, but I'm glad you got your bike fixed.
 

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..... The other part that strikes me as odd is an "exit tuning".....
When I bought a new bike about 3 years ago the shop [performance] did an exit "check" [I think they called it]. Looked more like what I'd call a safety check; made sure the skewers were tight, pumped air in the tires... mostly that sort of stuff. But the guy... who wasn't a mechanic but a sales person also adjusted the front derailleur.
 

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That's odd. I've been working on my bikes for ~22 years now and the only pins I'm aware of are on a chain. With one missing, I'd doubt you'd have gotten anywhere. More likely, the chain was damaged when it overshot and wedged between the spokes and cassette cog.

Cassette 'out of adjustment'? How? They're either installed correctly and tightened down or they aren't.

I think there's a level of BS at play here, but I'm glad you got your bike fixed.
This had me stumped as well, I could not think of any pin other than a chain pin. The only thing I have seen that could remotely make sense is on some cassettes almost all (maybe even all) of the cogs are joined together into one unit and this cassette had a very small screw that held all of the cogs in place. I think the cassette was a SRAM 9 spd IIRC. The screw came in fom the largest tooth cog and ended in the smallest. IIRC it was one of the lower middle price range.

I had an annoying rattle coming from the cassette area and some of the cogs were loose even though I torqued the lock ring properly, when I took the cassette off I saw a screw and figured it out.

But that issue should not cause what happened to you, I think that the shops inability to give you an explanation other than "take my word for it" you are missing a pin is a bit light to say the least. Did he take you back in the mechanic area and show you where the pin goes so you can inspect it in the future? I think they botched the tune and want to make it seem that it was a defective/missing part that caused the problem. Did you feel like taking a shower after this encounter?

Glad it is fixed at least, also you are correct that saddles are something that are swapped out regularly anyway.
 
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