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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
In the process of deciding on what to get for my cross bike. To start, I'm about 190lb and will be using this bike for some cross racing (hopefully) but also as my do everything type bike. For the frame, I'm planning on either a Seven Mudhoney, a Waterford X14, or a Gunnar Crosshairs, all dependent on my financial situation. Any and all opinions are welcome. My two questions are: 1)what fork to get (Wound-up, Reynolds, Sibex, etc) and 2) What wheels to use (I want to use King hubs, but am not sure about spokes or rims. I'd like to use some tubular tires,unless otherwise advised, so what would be a good choice for this?) I'm also wondering what everyone else is using for wheels (prebuilt or hand built). Thanks all.
 

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My thoughts...

Get an IF Planet Cross. Get King hubs, DT rims 32H, Michelin Jet tires. Reasons I say this: IF is a top knotch frame major comfy and a great racing frame, wheels are bomb proof, and tires will suit all your needs. Road riding, dirt road riding and even racing. For racing, just go to something like the Ritchey Speedmax and you've got the perfect set up.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
As far as the frame goes, I can get the above frames for close to dealer cost, which is partly why I chose them. Do you think the Indy Fab is worth the extra $? Thanks again
 

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Any of the above frame will work great assuming they fit. The fork will depend on your frame choice unless you go full custom (which I'm assuming you'll do via Waterford and Seven).

Wheels: Tubbies are better, end of story. However, they would be a major pain for day-to-day use; most of us only use them for racing, so if you want tubbies, I'd build 2 sets of wheels. While I like King hubs, they are pricey; I'd say they are overkill if you are on a budget. If you have a little extra money you don't mind throwing at the hubs and you don't mind the freehub noise, go for it.
Clincher rims= Open Pro or DT,
Tubular= Mavic reflex, Ambrosio F20. There are others of course, I'll let other people chime in with their recommendations.
 

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euro-trash said:
Any of the above frame will work great assuming they fit. The fork will depend on your frame choice unless you go full custom (which I'm assuming you'll do via Waterford and Seven).
For fork, I'd recommend the Reynolds. The Alpha Q is nice but a pain to set up (epoxy the Al sleeve and all). The Reynolds also has eyelets in case you want fenders -- a real bonus.

Wheels: Tubbies are better, end of story. However, they would be a major pain for day-to-day use; most of us only use them for racing, so if you want tubbies, I'd build 2 sets of wheels. While I like King hubs, they are pricey; I'd say they are overkill if you are on a budget. If you have a little extra money you don't mind throwing at the hubs and you don't mind the freehub noise, go for it.
Clincher rims= Open Pro or DT,
Tubular= Mavic reflex, Ambrosio F20. There are others of course, I'll let other people chime in with their recommendations.
Having two sets of wheels is a good idea whether you go tubs or not -- one set with knobbies and one set with slicks. I'll second the comment about King hubs. They are great hubs but if it means the difference between getting one set of wheels or two, choose a more economical hub.

For the racing wheels, go 32-hole cross-3. It will hold up well. I like DA hubs because they are easy to service, have fairly good seals to protect against the muck, and are pretty light.

I like Open Pros and Reflex rims since I find I can swap wheels and the brake pads still line up pretty well -- important if you swap wheels. Of course, I have some woefully mismatched rims that I still swap but I just live with uneven pad wear and poor braking on one set of rims..
 

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Gripped said:
The Reynolds also has eyelets in case you want fenders -- a real bonus.
Are you sure about the eyelets on the Reynolds? I haven't seen one in person but all of the pics I could find online show no eyelets.

I believe the Eason cx fork does have eyelets. I'm eyeing that because I'm really not thrilled with the non-eyelet front fender I'm using when the bike is doing commuter duty (i.e. every day during the week).
 

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well I'll be devils advocate

get the Sibex fork. (if it has eyelets) it weighs close to the CF's is less likely to fail and will most likely produce a much smoother ride. Gully and Jeremy were racing them last year and they seemed quite pleased. I love King Hubs but for cx I like the ease and cheapness of D/A, Ult, Chorus style hubs. With all the muck and gunk of cx an 'open bearing' wheel is much easier to service. Don't get me wrong I love Kings but I'd get 2 Ult. Wheelsets for the price of one King and in cross 2 medium usually trumps 1 swank.
3x 32 hole and Tubies.
 

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on another note

I got a Ridley Zornyc CF fork and the thing is damn beefy.rides real well (so far) pretty light, good looking and under $300. another great option but you have to time your order.
I'm sure the all CF Python is good as well.
 

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jnichols959 said:
Are you sure about the eyelets on the Reynolds? I haven't seen one in person but all of the pics I could find online show no eyelets.

I believe the Eason cx fork does have eyelets. I'm eyeing that because I'm really not thrilled with the non-eyelet front fender I'm using when the bike is doing commuter duty (i.e. every day during the week).
You're correct. I meant to suggest the Easton fork. I've got an Alpha Q and have zip tied the fender on. I found some zip ties with eyelets on the end that I use by the drop outs and then I use opposed zip ties around the fork shoulders to attach the top. It works quite well but not as well as proper eyelets and a driled hole in the arch.

Edit -- I use full fenders since I commute daily in the Pac NW.
 

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Back to the choice of frames, I have a Crosshairs and use it to tour, commute, race cyclocross, and long (100 to 280 mile) rides. I have 5 different sets of wheels for different purposes, so it is very versatile. I feel comfortable riding it on anything from fairly smooth singletrack to sphincter-clenching-fast paved descents (I've had it up to 57 mph...with a loaded Burley Nomad).

Having said that, I am planning to move to Seattle this fall and hopefully will be turning this into my rainbike/commuter when I upgrade to something deadly light and fast! :)
 
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