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(Yes, I already did a search)

All,
Im getting ready to assemble a set of fixie wheels. Im using SUN TA1's, Formula Hubs, and DT Revolutions (2.0/1.5) I read Sheldon's page, and some of the info on here.
So what are some of your tips and tricks ?
 

· wheelbuilder
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Steve-H said:
(Yes, I already did a search)

All,
Im getting ready to assemble a set of fixie wheels. Im using SUN TA1's, Formula Hubs, and DT Revolutions (2.0/1.5) I read Sheldon's page, and some of the info on here.
So what are some of your tips and tricks ?
Grease the nipple holes of the rim.

Use antiseaze compound on the threads.

If you are working with Revolutions for the first time, assemble the wheel. Before you start to tension the spokes, mark them on one side (by the nipple) with a Sharpie marker. You can check for spoke windup this way. Revolutions are more prone to windup than heavier gauge spokes.

-Eric
 

· Old, slow, and fat.
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Go slow
stress relieve. lots.
go slow
buy beers for your buddy the wheelbuilder guru to have him close, so he can say 'don't do that!' (just make sure YOU do the building, otherwise you don't learn anything)

With flexy spokes, I like to turn further than I need to, and then back off a bit to take out the twist. Seems to help.

M
 

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Use an actual grease for that, motor oil will tend to move and flow, grease stays put.
 

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Steve-H said:
Ok, thanks guys.

What do you recomend to grease the holes in the rim ? Something like motor oil, or something like Molly Grease ?
I use a small paint brush and slick honey but I also put the grease on the outside of every nipple as I am lacing the wheel. It sounds like alot of grease but a year from now you will still be able to turn the nipples to true the wheel with out them being frozen.
 

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When spoke tension is still low correct spoke line and bend the crossings around each other properly. Lightly tap spoke heads into the hub at almost final tension. It helps your wheels to remain the same state over time.
 

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divve said:
When spoke tension is still low correct spoke line and bend the crossings around each other properly. Lightly tap spoke heads into the hub at almost final tension. It helps your wheels to remain the same state over time.
Never heard this before. Where/when did you come by this?
Note: I am not trying to flame you, just curious.:confused:
Sounds like a good idea. I missed out doing this soo many times over the years.:blush2:
 

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It's described in various wheel building publications and instructed both by DT Swiss and Sapim. Your goal is to build a wheel that remains in the same state after it has been ridden as it left your truing stand. You can only achieve this when no permanent changes occur in your components during use.
 

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divve said:
It's described in various wheel building publications and instructed both by DT Swiss and Sapim. Your goal is to build a wheel that remains in the same state after it has been ridden as it left your truing stand. You can only achieve this when no permanent changes occur in your components during use.
OK. I was only asking about the spoke head tapping into the rim. Thats a real good idea
to seat the spoke heads at time = 0, rather than let them seat naturally after tensioning
and riding many miles. Funny I never came across this in Brandt's(spelling?) book about
wheel building. I have the first edition, in case he modified it.
 

· Chili hed & old bike fixr
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Dt actually makes a tool for seating the spoke heads, er, maybe re-labels a European nail set. This is also very handy when using the brass washers. Oh, you don't know about those either? Those are for when you use 15 G spokes, or 14G spokes, if the spoke hole in the rim exceeds 2.3 MM dia.. You can find the reference in Schraners "Art Of Wheelbuilding"
 

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divve said:
Your goal is to build a wheel that remains in the same state after it has been ridden as it left your truing stand. You can only achieve this when no permanent changes occur in your components during use.
Yup...A good wheel build is a painstaking, slow, and tedious process... which is why most wheels you buy are not built very well. It takes a lot more than just sticking the spokes in and making them true! Patience is certainly a virtue, here...
 

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Yeah...

Some wheelbuilders use a spoke head setting tool (e.g., a punch) while others do not. I have wheels built by both "camps." The only difference I noticed was that the "punch" camp liked to let the punch slip and put nice little "divots" into a set of upper-end hubs and then use a sharpie to try and cover it up. When I complained, I was told this was standard operating procedure.
 
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