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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Greetings all, I have a tendency to give out bikes during the holidays (gave 2 kids bikes to friend's son and to another friend's nephew) and to keep with the spirit, I am planning on fixing up a bike for a clyde friend of mine. I snagged a Trek 7300 FX frameset that was parted out and plan on using that as the base. Naturally it doesn't have wheels. I currently have a set of A class wheels from a recent purchase that I am willing to part with but not sure if it will handle his added weight well (20/24 spoke front/rear). Anyways, here's my list:

  • Why do you want new wheels? What's wrong with your old ones?
    New wheels for a Trek 7300 FX hybrid frameset
  • What are you old ones? (rim name, hub name, spokes, their numbers)
    Have a set of A Class Wheels that can be used for this build, but 20/24 spoke.
  • How much do you want to spend?
    <$250
  • How heavy are you?
    300 pounds
  • Do you ride "light" or "heavy"? Are you powerful or smooth?
    Getting back into cycling after a 25 year gap, not sure of riding style
  • Have you had problems with your current wheels and if so, what?
    NA
  • What condition are the roads in that you ride?
    Sidewalk,MUT and some park dirt paths
  • What tires, widths and pressures are you using?
    Tires for a hybrid. 700x32 or 700x35
  • What do you expect from your new wheels that your old ones can't deliver? (be reasonable and realistic here!)
    Looking for something that will serve well for heavier rider
  • What are you going to use the wheels for - recreational riding, touring (loaded), training, racing, general purpose?
    Recreational (<20 miles per ride, possibly up to 40 in the future)
  • Do you want custom hand-built (designed for you) or factory pre-built?
    No preference
  • Do you want wheels that are easily repairable with readily available, reasonably priced spokes and rims or are you ok with maybe having to ship your wheels back to the factory and wheels that contain expensive, proprietary spokes and possibly un-obtainium replacement rims?
    Easily repairable is preferred
  • Do you need 11spd compatible wheels (can be used with 8 ~10spd cassettes too by using a spacer) or are 10spd wheels ok? (can only be used with 8 ~ 10spd cassettes). Edit - This info is for Shimano & SRAM related cassettes; not Campagnolo.
    May as well be 11 spd compatible (using a SRAM Red 10 speed groupset)
  • Do you want the wheels to be oriented towards "aero" or "light"?
    Sturdy
  • Do you want to use regular clincher, tubeless, or tubular tires?
    Regular Clincher
  • Aluminum or carbon rims?
    Aluminum
  • Rim brakes or disk brakes?
    Rim
  • Rear hub width? (120, 126, 130, 135MM)
    135 mm
  • Do you want adjustable loose ball bearing hubs (almost exclusively Shimano) or cartridge bearing hubs (almost everything else)?
    No preference
 

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Your specs call for a tough wheel to find ready-made and of decent quality. Your best bet is to build it yourself and IMO it is precisely this kind of circumstances that make custom wheel building unparaleled to the ready-made wheels you find at the store.

If it was me building it I would use the following:

Rims: H+Son F30 or Velocity Chukker/Dyad/Deep V or equivalent. H+Son is top quality, Velocity not as consistent. Rear 36h, front 32 or 36h.
If you prefer low profile rims Ryde makes the Rigida Sputnik which although at lower profile is super strong but also is the widest and heaviest from the rest. It is meant for loaded touring usage but may not to be as easy to find as the others.

Hubs: Shimano Deore LX. You want steel and large bearings not aluminum and small bearings so the XT is out. Not 11 speed compatible but no reason to be.

Spokes: Double butted 2/1.8/2 mm or triple butted 2.18/1.8/2 mm. Sapim are good. Butted not straight gauge.

Nipples: Brass

Lacing: x3 all around

Price range: rim set $100-$120, hub set $60, spokes $40-$50, nipples $8
And you got $10 left for a nicely crafted 6-pack to help with the built!

EDIT TO ADD: Forget about putting a 300 lber on a 20/24 spoke wheel
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Your specs call for a tough wheel to find ready-made and of decent quality. Your best bet is to build it yourself and IMO it is precisely this kind of circumstances that make custom wheel building unparaleled to the ready-made wheels you find at the store.

If it was me building it I would use the following:

Rims: H+Son F30 or Velocity Chukker/Dyad/Deep V or equivalent. H+Son is top quality, Velocity not as consistent. Rear 36h, front 32 or 36h.
If you prefer low profile rims Ryde makes the Rigida Sputnik which although at lower profile is super strong but also is the widest and heaviest from the rest. It is meant for loaded touring usage but may not to be as easy to find as the others.

Hubs: Shimano Deore LX. You want steel and large bearings not aluminum and small bearings so the XT is out. Not 11 speed compatible but no reason to be.

EDIT TO ADD: Forget about putting a 300 lber on a 20/24 spoke wheel
Looks like the H Plus Son F30 is not rim brake compatible, how [in]consistent is the quality of Velocity wheels?

Also, the build will most likely use a 9 or 10 speed cassette, I copied and pasted the bullet points and forgot to edit the cassette line last night.
 

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Yes , the F30 is not rim brake compatible. The SL42 is but a bit too much as far as depth goes and not in 36h. The Archetype may do as is the Kinlin 31. Velocity rims have had their fair share of quality issues like uneven joints, marginal trueness, unchamfered drillings, etc.
 

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How about the DT Swiss TK 540 rim? Those look like good robust touring rims.

Shimano LX are great hubs, but does Shimano even make these anymore? Wouldn't you have to rely on whatever new/old stock is out there?
 

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How about the DT Swiss TK 540 rim? Those look like good robust touring rims.

Shimano LX are great hubs, but does Shimano even make these anymore? Wouldn't you have to rely on whatever new/old stock is out there?
The DT are great rims but are pushing the OP's budget upwards.

The Deore LX are still readily available and I hope they will be for some time. Not many options on rim brake 10s 135's left.
 

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The Deore LX are still readily available and I hope they will be for some time. Not many options on rim brake 10s 135's left.
There can't be many negatives to fixing the current problem and looking to the future by going with 11-spd disc brake hubs.
 

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There can't be many negatives to fixing the current problem and looking to the future by going with 11-spd disc brake hubs.
Opinions differ on the subject of road discs and mine is that I have yet to see the need for a disc brake and/or 11 speeds on a touring bike.
 

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Opinions differ on the subject of road discs and mine is that I have yet to see the need for a disc brake and/or 11 speeds on a touring bike.
Me neither (I'll be a road rim-braking 10speeder for the remainder of my riding days) but 135 non-disc hubs are getting more scarce and an 11spd/disc hub would allow future options and maybe better re-saleability.
 

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Unfortunately yes. I just finished building a wheelset for a touring bike I'm expecting. Brakes of choice are brazed-on Paul's center pulls. Choice on hubs was very limited. I ended up with WI MI5s.
I prefer steel curved forks on a tourer over straight forks of any material and one of the reasons for the non-disc hub preference is that rim brakes do not require as stiff forks as discs do.
 

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Opinions differ on the subject of road discs and mine is that I have yet to see the need for a disc brake and/or 11 speeds on a touring bike.
I would think a tourer is a better place for discs then other road applications. Discs don't fade on long downhills, a likely scenario with a loaded bike, as well tourers are more likely to be ridden in the rain. Seems like a perfect application for discs.
 

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I would think a tourer is a better place for discs then other road applications. Discs don't fade on long downhills, a likely scenario with a loaded bike, as well tourers are more likely to be ridden in the rain. Seems like a perfect application for discs.
Never had a problem stopping a tourer equipped with quality rim brakes.
 

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Never had a problem stopping a tourer equipped with quality rim brakes.
I had my pads grind to nothing while doing Red Mt., Molas and Engineers pass in CO., all one day in the rain. Seems the water coming off the hills is high in grit and wears the brakes pads down very quickly. I was lucky to hear the grinding in the rear and was able to do a reset of the pads to not dive under the rims. Put new pads on in Durango.

Discs seem to be a perfect solution to such situations and they DO stop better when wet.

Note that I otherwise don't see then need and the discs on my FS Specialized sound like they are auditioning for Deliverance. Hate them.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Your specs call for a tough wheel to find ready-made and of decent quality. Your best bet is to build it yourself and IMO it is precisely this kind of circumstances that make custom wheel building unparaleled to the ready-made wheels you find at the store.

If it was me building it I would use the following:

Rims: H+Son F30 or Velocity Chukker/Dyad/Deep V or equivalent. H+Son is top quality, Velocity not as consistent. Rear 36h, front 32 or 36h.
If you prefer low profile rims Ryde makes the Rigida Sputnik which although at lower profile is super strong but also is the widest and heaviest from the rest. It is meant for loaded touring usage but may not to be as easy to find as the others.

Hubs: Shimano Deore LX. You want steel and large bearings not aluminum and small bearings so the XT is out. Not 11 speed compatible but no reason to be.

Spokes: Double butted 2/1.8/2 mm or triple butted 2.18/1.8/2 mm. Sapim are good. Butted not straight gauge.

Nipples: Brass

Lacing: x3 all around

Price range: rim set $100-$120, hub set $60, spokes $40-$50, nipples $8
And you got $10 left for a nicely crafted 6-pack to help with the built!

EDIT TO ADD: Forget about putting a 300 lber on a 20/24 spoke wheel
So I was poking around eBay and found pretty much this set of recommendations for $220 shipped (only difference is the spokes):

Rims: Velocity Dyad 700c
Spoke Count: 36

Hubs: Shimano Deore LX T670

Spoke: DT Swiss 2.0 mm straight gauge laced with DT Swiss brass nipples


If he has any issues, I will get the triple butted spokes and do my first wheel build :). Thanks again for the advice.
 

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So I was poking around eBay and found pretty much this set of recommendations for $220 shipped (only difference is the spokes):
Rims: Velocity Dyad 700c
Spoke Count: 36
Hubs: Shimano Deore LX T670
Spoke: DT Swiss 2.0 mm straight gauge laced with DT Swiss brass nipples
If he has any issues, I will get the triple butted spokes and do my first wheel build :). Thanks again for the advice.
The spec might be ok (minus the straight gauge spokes) but equally important is the quality of the building job. A poor job won't last the first ride while a good job will last the life of the rims. With e-bay wheels you have no idea how good the job is.

But if you insist on them, check out the wheels by using the info on my site. With an hour's TLC you could take the wheels from poor to good.
 

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@jason124

What Mike said. As per my initial recommendations, the rims are ok and the hubs are good. The straight gauge spokes are not optimal for your application. Butted spokes, properly tensioned and stress relieved, will help the wheel stay put when your friend rolls over potholes.
If you do decide to go ahead with the set from eBay, check the spoke tension for uniformity, check spoke alignment, check the dish, stress relieve and check tension again before you give the wheels to your friend. Chances are their QC is not up to par.
When truing the wheel keep in mind that depending on how true the Dyad rims were before laced, you may have to compromise between wheel trueness and spoke equal tension some.
If you are not familiar with some of the terms or processes I mentioned, an excellent reference on building wheels is Roger Musson's Wheel Building.
 

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I had my pads grind to nothing while doing Red Mt., Molas and Engineers pass in CO., all one day in the rain. Seems the water coming off the hills is high in grit and wears the brakes pads down very quickly. I was lucky to hear the grinding in the rear and was able to do a reset of the pads to not dive under the rims. Put new pads on in Durango.

Discs seem to be a perfect solution to such situations and they DO stop better when wet.

Note that I otherwise don't see then need and the discs on my FS Specialized sound like they are auditioning for Deliverance. Hate them.
Yes, they do tend to chirp and that drives me nuts as well.

In my experience, I find that the choice on the type of rim brakes or disc brakes as well as the choice of pads greatly affects their feedback and stopping power. With alloy rims I have found that quality rim brakes with appropriate pads generally stop the bike better than mechanical discs.
I have no doubt that quality hydraulics have their place and I'm not arguing their merits in technical descents, carbon rims, etc. I'm just saying that under touring conditions, I do not see the need to adopt another system and its unique set of problems just for the very occasional instance their use might had been better. In other words, I'll pick brakes with the 98% use in mind rather than the 2%.
 

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the discs on my FS Specialized sound like they are auditioning for Deliverance. Hate them.
Super easy to eliminate. Remove pads from calipers and give the faces a light sanding. Then grease the back side of the pads with thick grease (red boat trailer grease works perfectly) or disc brake silencer from the car parts store. Give the rotors a few passes with an abrasive cloth and clean with rubbing alcohol. Reinstall everything, making sure the calipers are square to the rotors (for the most part - no rotor is 100% straight) and all fasteners are appropriately tight. Make several progressively harder stops to bed the pads and rotors in, and you're done for probably a season. You'll get minor initial squeal when it's damp out, and they'll make noise when they're full on wet but hey - at least you'll stop.
 
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