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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am running well over budget on a build and need to keep the wife from banging me on the head with a frying pan. I found a brand of spokes called Wheelmaster. I have always used Wheelsmith and never had any problems. The Wheelmasters are a good bit cheaper and include nipples. The only thing I could find on them was a very old post from 2009 on another forum. They were described as an OEM quality spoke. I will be using 14ga straight spokes. Opinions welcome.
 

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Spend the money for good spokes.

Why are you using 14g? Butted spokes are lighter and less likely to break. I would only use 14g for a wheel with poor lateral stiffness. And the better way to fix that is to use more spokes or a hub with better flange geometry or a stiffer rim.
 

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Eat jam sammiches for a month and buy the right spokes - Sapim Race or DT Comp. Yeah ok, Wheelsmith too.
^^^This^^^ And putting some peanut butter in there won't cost much more.

If it sounds too good to be true...... You get what you pay for. Pay now, or pay later.

Choose your cliche.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Spend the money for good spokes.

Why are you using 14g? Butted spokes are lighter and less likely to break. I would only use 14g for a wheel with poor lateral stiffness. And the better way to fix that is to use more spokes or a hub with better flange geometry or a stiffer rim.
I like fat spokes
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I think OEM was meant to mean, the kind that they use on super cheap $90 road bikes sold at Walmart. You guys are correct, what was I thinking ??
 

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I like fat spokes

Why? Because you perceive them to be stronger, or do you just like the way they look? Counterintuitively, butted spokes are actually more durable because they will flex in the middle, not at the ends where the weak points are.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I do consider them stiffer. But, I am a rookie willing to be educated. This is only my third set of wheels. My first bike build, although I have refurbished several.
 

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I do consider them stiffer. But, I am a rookie willing to be educated. This is only my third set of wheels. My first bike build, although I have refurbished several.
What rims and hubs are you planning to use? What spoke count?

Trust me when I say a pair of 32 hole HED C2s, Ultegra 6800 hubs and DT Competition 14/15/14 spokes laced 3-cross will be more than plenty stiff. These are around 1850g and clyde friendly as well. Handling and stability are excellent, if not slightly harsh feeling. A little less tire pressure solves the harshness issue.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
What rims and hubs are you planning to use? What spoke count?

Trust me when I say a pair of 32 hole HED C2s, Ultegra 6800 hubs and DT Competition 14/15/14 spokes laced 3-cross will be more than plenty stiff. These are around 1850g and clyde friendly as well. Handling and stability are excellent, if not slightly harsh feeling. A little less tire pressure solves the harshness issue.
The hubs are early 80s Campagnolo Record (7 speed freewheel hub) in the rear, 36 hole front hub. Rims are H Plus son TB14 polished silver. These are for a 1980s Bianchi I am building to hopefully ride in L’Eroica California when I retire next year.
 

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The hubs are early 80s Campagnolo Record (7 speed freewheel hub) in the rear, 36 hole front hub. Rims are H Plus son TB14 polished silver. These are for a 1980s Bianchi I am building to hopefully ride in L’Eroica California when I retire next year.
Ahhh, going retro. TB14s are a shallow box rim so I sort of understand your concern about stiffness. However, at 490g, they are quite robust for a rim of those dimensions. And the wider profile will give it plenty of stiffness. I'm pretty sure they could tolerate 130kgf on the DS. And the fact that you are using 7-speed hubs, the disparity bewtween DS and NDS is nowhere near what it is for 11-speed hubs. So here again, less worry about stiffness.

It's up to you, but for longevity and durability, double butted 14/15/14 spokes are your best bet. I really don't think you will notice any stiffness difference between butted and straight gauge. I used DT Competition spokes and DT ProLock nipples because that is what my bike shop sells. Sapim Race are just as good. Wheelsmith (not Wheelmaster) spoke and nipples have a nicer finish (plated rather than powder coated), though one mechanic I know claims that they have a higher failure rate than DT or Sapim. I think I'd rather go with reliable even if it means a little noticeable scuffing on spokes and nipples.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
Ahhh, going retro. TB14s are a shallow box rim so I sort of understand your concern about stiffness. However, at 490g, they are quite robust for a rim of those dimensions. And the wider profile will give it plenty of stiffness. I'm pretty sure they could tolerate 130kgf on the DS. And the fact that you are using 7-speed hubs, the disparity bewtween DS and NDS is nowhere near what it is for 11-speed hubs. So here again, less worry about stiffness.

It's up to you, but for longevity and durability, double butted 14/15/14 spokes are your best bet. I really don't think you will notice any stiffness difference between butted and straight gauge. I used DT Competition spokes and DT ProLock nipples because that is what my bike shop sells. Sapim Race are just as good. Wheelsmith (not Wheelmaster) spoke and nipples have a nicer finish (plated rather than powder coated), though one mechanic I know claims that they have a higher failure rate than DT or Sapim. I think I'd rather go with reliable even if it means a little noticeable scuffing on spokes and nipples.
I have used Wheelsmith SS14 and Wheelsmith nipples on all my previous wheels. I also have a very large supply of used spokes and nipples that were given to me by an old bike mechanic who was cleaning out his garage. Saving these for repair work down the road. After I retire I am going to try and help out at local bike CO-OP.
 
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