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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am trying to replace the worn out wheels on my 1970's Motobecane and I have run into yet another problem. The bike uses 27 1 1/4 wheels, so I bought a set of 27 1 1/4 wheels. I didn't find out they were too wide until I tried to put them on the bike. I'm guess I am going to have to replace the wheels with narrower ones, but just in case, is there anyway these wheels will work?

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Know It All
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Just to clarify, by wheel do you mean 1) the tire or 2) the hub, spokes, and rim? If the latter, what is to wide? The rim or the hub? If the former, do you mean that it wont fit on the rim, or that it won't fit through the brakes?
 

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Spread 'em

Your bike likely has a 124 mm wide rear hub spacing, whereas the standard now is 130. You can spread the frame with the "yank and crank" method, but you might find success by simply spreading the dropouts, inserting the wheel, and riding. Those frames weren't that tough, and it may just spread as you ride. This has been reported numerous times. The bigger question might be that since this bike is most likely 5 speed friction shifting, what are you going to do with a hub that will now take 10 cogs?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I'm sorry for the confusion. I ment the hub is too wide for the frame in the back. The "claws" that the wheel slide into are too narrow. there are spacers on the hubs, then the threads. the threads are to far about for my frame. I will take them back to my LBS today.
 

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links0311 said:
I'm sorry for the confusion. I ment the hub is too wide for the frame in the back. The "claws" that the wheel slide into are too narrow. there are spacers on the hubs, then the threads. the threads are to far about for my frame. I will take them back to my LBS today.
The "claws" are called dropouts, and are most likely spaced at 120mm in a bike of that age. Chances are the wheel you bought was spaced for 126mm dropout spacing, which was common about 20 years ago. There is a good chance that you can replace either the axle or the spacers on the axle to fit your bike. Please, get your terminology right first, since most bike mechanics don't want to take the time to figure out what you want.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
you're right

You were right about the spacers. I replaced the ones that were on the hub with smaller ones and the wheel went on with no problem. This bike has been one problem another. I thought i would save some money by buying an old road bike, but the cost of replacing old worn out pieces is starting to add up. Thanks again for the help, and I'll work on terminology next time.

Bedau
 

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Fixing/upgrading old bikes can cost a fortune!

5-6 years ago I had a nice, custom bike that had been built for me in 1984, and I wanted to upgrade it to indexed shifting. Ha, ha! The joke was on me! The cost of upgrading, including new wheels was prohibitive. Even though I still liked the bike, in the end I just sent it down the road and bought a new bike. Only got a fraction of its original cost when I sold it, even though it was in near-mint condition, with mostly Campy/Phil Wood components. Sheesh!
 
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