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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm thinking about getting an FSA crank, and was wondering where they are made. Anybody know off the top of their head?
 

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Carbon Fiber = Explode!
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Dude, they're made by my second cousins in a sweatshop in China.

Everything is in Asia something.
 

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Use my Apps :)
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Still got the box for my Gossamer Maga Exo compact. Says "Made in Taiwan"
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Okay, that question has now been answered with some direct evidence from a box. I was hoping it was Italy, but I knew it was a big hope.
 

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Juan Valdez.
Seriously, you will not be requred to take an allegiance oath to the country
of origin, neither will you be required to marry the daughter of the mayor.
(Wait, that could be a good thing!)
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Isn't Juan Valdez linked to Columbian coffee.

Yes, I know I won't have to take an oath, but it is kind of hard to put a different crank on my bike when the entire bike is Colnago, Campagnolo, and Cinelli, with the exception of the DT Swiss spokes, the Fizik Saddle, and the Tufo tires. Trust me, it mentally hurt to not use a Selle Italia saddle but it physically hurt to use a Selle Italia saddle. With the tires, I could easily go back to Vittorias. I'm SOL on the spokes. For some reason, I just hate putting a non Campy crank on my Campy equipped bikes, but I am thinking about getting the Cinqo powermeter and it only works with the SRAM S900, Truvativ Rouleur Carbon, FSA Team Issue carbon, and one other crankset. Right now, I am leaning toward the SRAM, but this purchase will probably wait until the winter, and maybe even next spring. Who knows.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I've never really had to worry about this because I usually use Campagnolo. Cinelli USED to be made in Italy, but now it appears to be made in Taiwan too. I have one set of Ram bars that say MADE in Italy on them and another set that says DESIGNED in Italy on it.

I knew that SRAM was made in Taiwan, along with Truvativ, but those were my first picks out of the cranks offered. If FSA was made in Italy, I would have gone with it since it isn't much different. Alas, all the options are made in Asia, so I'll go with the SRAM, especially since I heard a fellow rider's FSA BB creaking like crazy on today's ride.
 

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Rubber Lizard said:
If its a bike component and its not made by Shimano or Campagnolo it is made in Taiwan. There are very few exceptions to that rule. .
Sadly, that is the truth. Off the top of my head, I can only think of two popular manufacturers still making components in the U.S.:
  • Thomson - Stems & Seatposts
  • Chris King - Headsets & Hubs
There are also several "boutique" components from companies like PAUL and Phil Wood, but pretty rare to see them.

Paul
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
If that question is aimed at me, I have no idea where you get "I hate Taiwan" from. Next thing you know, you will call me a racist towards Taiwanese people. I don't have anything against Taiwan, but I am pretty anal about my bikes. I prefer them to be as Italian as possible, since I am 100% Italian. IT is just my preference. Kind of like I prefer a certain type of woman over another. Kind of like I prefer steak to other meat. I merely prefer to have my bikes as Italian as possible, and I do not hate Taiwan or Taiwanese people.
 

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monkey with flamethrower
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Paul1PA said:
Sadly, that is the truth. Off the top of my head, I can only think of two popular manufacturers still making components in the U.S.:
  • Thomson - Stems & Seatposts
  • Chris King - Headsets & Hubs
There are also several "boutique" components from companies like PAUL and Phil Wood, but pretty rare to see them.

Paul
These companies are great examples that prove that you still can make great components at competitive prices in the USA. You might not make as much money, but its still doable and profitable.

No need to worry about the quality of Taiwan sourced components. Taiwan is where the bike industry is at. The cost to quality ratio of most Taiwan sourced components is amazing. If Taiwan made poor quality bikes, components, computers, plasma screen tv's, ect then no company would have their parts made in Taiwan. Taiwan is not a backwater rice paddy third world nation. Taiwan is a nation as modern as the United States or Italy.
Yeah, its too bad that Italy doesn't really make bikes or bike components anymore. I will admit that even though Taiwan makes parts to the highest quality, something about 'made in Italy' is oddly appealing. Even Campagnolo, possibly the greatest name in cycling is no longer made in Italy. It is a shame.
 

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Stronglight still make most(?) of their components in France, and there's Mavic, but I'm think they've shipped their manufacturing out to eastern Europe. And after a moments Googling, I stole this from another forum; components made in the UK (although they're all fairly obscure):

Middleburn (cranks, chainrings, hubs, chainring bolts, headset spacers)
Royce (hubs, chainring bolts, bb)
Hope (brakes, hubs, stems, headsets, skewers, )
Use (bottle cages, posts, bars, stems, shims, saddles, skewers, sus forks)
Goldtec (hubs, chainrings)
Brooks (saddles, bartape, bags)
 

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Formosan Cyclocross
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Being a strong supporter of Taiwan and an actual resident of the country... I don't see anything wrong with what dwwheels is saying. We do read a lot of racialist rants around here, but this is not one of them.

I respect the project: An Italian bike with Italian parts... sounds classic and beautiful....
Part of the beauty of building a bike is the concept of the build. It adds a little artistry and intimacy to the experience in a sort of Duchamp sort of way. Bikes are essentially a frame, a chain drive and wheels. The builder's selection of the parts "frames" the bicycle, making it not the technique of putting parts together that is the art, but the "framing".

I'd like to see it.
 

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monkey with flamethrower
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I can tell that this thread could turn into a string of posts in which everyone defends their favorite boutique manufacturer that is still locally made. These boutiques are great, and produce wonderful stuff and provide good competition to the big names in the aftermarket segment at times.
But truth be told, very few of these manufactures have the volume to provide components for OEMs. Thats why they are boutiques and not ubiquitous on every bike.
 

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Hey, look, I'm riding my Cannondale Optimo with Campy 10 ergo and an FSA carbon pro crankset. Why? Because I thought it just looked cooler than the Campy. No compatibility problems and it's fine by me that it was made in Taiwan.

Being a baby-boomer born in the early '50's, I recall when "Made in Japan" was synonymous with cheap merchandise. How times have changed!
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Yep, times have changed. When I started riding/racing seriously back in the mid 80's, my racing bike was a Mino Denti decked out with Campy Super Record, Selle Italia saddle, Cinelli bars and stem, and several wheels built with Campy Victory Strada and Record Crono rims and Campy Record and C Record hubs. I had wanted a Colnago, but my parents couldn't afford that frame.

Everything in commerce changes. When I first started my search for a new bike, I even thought about trying to build an all American bike with a Trek or Specialized frame. My reason for that one was because it would hurt a lot to spend $4,000 on a Colnago frame and I wanted to keep my money in my home country. After figuring out that I couldn't get American made components for the build, I went back to an Italian build and almost decided on a Bianchi 928 lugged frame until I came across a Colnago Cristallo for $2,500 from Switzerland. So, I bit the bullet and bought the Cristallo.

Here are some pics of the bikes. I don't have a profile one of the Cristallo on this computer and I am too lazy right now to get it off of the other computer.

Okay, found a link to the Cristallo from a previous post, but it has the Record Strada wheel on the rear and Zipp 202 up front:

https://gallery.roadbikereview.com/data/roadbike/500/medium/Bike_16.jpg
 
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