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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
I'm stumped here ... the cable attachment bolt is obvious on the FD. But the cable's housing needs to push against another solid place in order to overcome the spring's tension. Where do I attach the housing?

For their RD, the housing has a specific hole to go into and the cable emerges, without housing, from the other side.

But for their FD, there is no such hole for the housing to go into.

The FD hanger is the small rectangle at the top of the picture. That's the only thing this frame has to attach anything near where the FD goes.

This frame is the WS02 from GOTOBIKE CARBON COMPOSITE TECHNOLOGY CO.,LTD

View attachment 280224
 

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Discussion Starter · #2 ·
I figured it out already. There is no housing stop on the FD itself. The FD cable wounds around the BB's underside and then goes through the frame and emerges up top, heading straight towards the FD's cable attachment point.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Since 1994.

But I'm a mechanical purist.

Exposed cable sent around sharp bends seemed such a cheap solution that it never occurred to me that is the solution the frame designers chose.

I want a more elegant solution that offers less friction.

A bling solution anyone?
 

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Since 1994.

But I'm a mechanical purist.

Exposed cable sent around sharp bends seemed such a cheap solution that it never occurred to me that is the solution the frame designers chose.

I want a more elegant solution that offers less friction.

A bling solution anyone?
jumping jesus.... the current solution is the optimal one. That's why they got rid of that stupid loop of housing that they used to use in the 70s. It added friction - especially once the cable started corroding, as they always did.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
If the full housing reaches from control to the FD, then no corrosion will occur, and friction will be less if cable does not go around sharp bends.

I was disappointed that I was not offered that option.
 

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If the full housing reaches from control to the FD, then no corrosion will occur, and friction will be less if cable does not go around sharp bends.

I was disappointed that I was not offered that option.
Huffys and other cheap crap used full cable housing. It still corroded. It isn't a sealed system. If it IS a sealed system, then there's friction.

"Option"? Who the hell wants the option of cabling their new bike in the fashion of a 1974 Huffy Crapmaster???
 

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Several problems with your "solution"
  1. Extra weight of the outer casing
  2. increased friction due to the entire cable being in contact with the casing
  3. Moisture would be more likely to gather in the casing than current set up
  4. The path the cable needs to take in a fully sheathed set up will need to be less direct to allow for the increased friction

Simple thing is that the current set up is the most effective one for mechanical systems. Cables are consumables, just like chains, cassettes, brake pads & bearings. They should be replaced every 2 years or less if racing. The friction issue is a red herring. In most instances there is a problem with excess friction when cables have been poorly installed or regular maintenance has been neglected.

http://www.campagnolo.com/repository/documenti/en/Maintenance_periods_components.pdf
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
OK, I buy your argument.

My old bike has rusted, exposed cables connected to down tube shifters, and the shifting still works fine. If that is the major reason the industry went in this direction, then I think they reached the right conclusion.
 

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If the full housing reaches from control to the FD, then no corrosion will occur, and friction will be less if cable does not go around sharp bends.

I was disappointed that I was not offered that option.
wow...really? do you really think you have a better solution to this than EVERY engineer in the bicycle industry? you must be one smart feller.
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Ok, to keep things on topic: the FD hanger that came with the frame is 5mm too high, so the FD does not come close enough to the chain ring, based on the 2mm max as specified in their instructions.

Are there after market suppliers for this part that may remedy the problem?

BTW, I'm on very good terms with several LBS, so this is just me trying to be as self sufficient as possible instead of being a pure consumer or an iPerson who doesn't know what he wants.
 

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OK, I buy your argument.

My old bike has rusted, exposed cables connected to down tube shifters, and the shifting still works fine. If that is the major reason the industry went in this direction, then I think they reached the right conclusion.
in the last 20 years the only major 'innovation' has been electronic shifting. everything else has just been small improvements here and there. there are hundreds if not thousands of very smart people involved w/ drivetrain development if you look at the whole industry...if full-length housing was needed for the front derailleur, we'd have it. trust me.
 

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Ok, to keep things on topic: the FD hanger that came with the frame is 5mm too high, so the FD does not come close enough to the chain ring, based on the 2mm max as specified in their instructions.

Are there after market suppliers for this part that may remedy the problem?

BTW, I'm on very good terms with several LBS, so this is just me trying to be as self sufficient as possible instead of being a pure consumer or an iPerson who doesn't know what he wants.
As compensation for the FD hanger too high however, you did get all this:

NO.1---safety:no inner wrinkle of carbon fibre.

NO.2---Lighter weight below 1000g for frames.

NO.3---front triangleis moulded in one time,less agglutination, more powerfull.

NO.4---the agglutination position is shaped in moulding procesess, not machine work, this avoids breaking the fibres.

NO.5---stairway agglutination,make agglutination surface larger.

NO.6---distributer the joint of fibre in average to enhance the intensity by avoiding stress concentration.
 

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nice looking 'chinese' frame. looks like they're trying to copy both the Venge and the '12 Madone at the same time.

oh, the front derailleur braze-on is too high? on a chinese frame? no waaaayyyyyy...i hope they help you out w/ that. any bike you bought in the US from an authorized dealer would be replaced/repaired without issue. good luck.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I have a better picture but right now I can't upload it ... due to problems on my end.

The hanger has a slot in the middle of the rectangle. The FD only has a single mounting bolt. This bolt slides up and down within that slot. I slide it down all the way, to bring the FD as close as possible to the chain ring. Note that the picture as posted is upside down. I spun the bike around on the repair stand to put some natural light on the components.

I just checked it again, and it's very close: 4mm from FD to chain ring teeth, instead of the recommended maximum of 2mm - 1mm. But the hanger is not removable from the frame, so I think I'm stuck.

Anyway, it's close enough. I won't sweat over it (as other posters have reminded me, this is a bicycle ...).

I'll log off now and switch to another activity, which I hope to get done before sunset on PST: put in new fuel injectors in my 13 years old Honda S2000. I have done this procedure twice on other Honda cars in the past, so I hope to get it done before it gets dark outside.
 
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