Road Bike, Cycling Forums banner
1 - 14 of 14 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
520 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
sure it's a newbie question, but i've only gotten serious about cycling this past summer. my question is, how high should the post be before it gets ineffective to have it higher? i know you want room for your legs to stretch and to simulate an out of the saddle posture, but where and how do you determine where to draw the line? thanks in advance for any advice.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,009 Posts
I like to have mine as high as possible without my toes pointing down. If you raise it to high to fast you'll feel a tendon pull in the back of the leg or ankle which if you don't lower it a little will get worse.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,620 Posts
http://www.competitivecyclist.com/pdf/fit_details.pdf

Wear your cycling shorts, and take the measurements in bare feet.
1. Inseam
Set your feet approximately 8" apart and straddle a straight edge – something like a square or a 2' level is ideal. Put as much pressure on your crotch as you feel when sitting on your bike seat. Measure the distance from the top of the level to the ground. Alternatively, mark the wall, then step away and take the measurement of the mark to the ground. And whatever you do, please don't use the inseam measurement from your Levi's! Pants inseams are at least 2" shorter than your actual inseam.


There are numerous techniques for determining your ideal size and fit, the most widely accepted of which is the "Lemond method", as set forth by Greg Lemond in his classic late-80's book "The Complete Book of Bicycling". The Lemond method provides the logic and the math behind virtually every bike fitting system you'll encounter. Whether your fitting is performed in a retail environment with tools such as Bio-Racer, the Fit Stik or the Fit Kit, or if you've derived your fit from a database-driven on-line fitting system, certain truths almost always hold true:
1. You will always be asked for your inseam, and you will always be provided with the following conclusions:
a. Your center-to-center seat tube will equal (inseam x 0.65).
b. Your center-to-top seat tube will equal (inseam x 0.67).
c. Your bb-saddle height will equal (inseam x 0.883).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,832 Posts
Better guidance

tindrum said:
sure it's a newbie question, but i've only gotten serious about cycling this past summer. my question is, how high should the post be before it gets ineffective to have it higher? i know you want room for your legs to stretch and to simulate an out of the saddle posture, but where and how do you determine where to draw the line? thanks in advance for any advice.
The best range is that your pedal to saddle top distance should be 108-110% of your cycling inseam. Within that range, it's about personal preference. The problem with the 0.883 formula is that it ignores your crank length and the stack height of your pedals. Your cycling inseam is taken with your feet 6 inches apart and a dowel or book pressed up into your crotch (IOW, not your pants inseam measure).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
97 Posts
sounds like you need the eddie borysewicz book. another late 80's staple, similar to lemond's. a friend loaned me his a few moths ago. pretty interesteing read. he's found that the ideal position is 96%. but there is a speciic formula to achieve that 96%. he takes into accout the sole of your cleats, crank legnth, even the pad in your chamois. if you were a different chamois,,,,,,you need to remeasure. at 96 % you're gaining the optimal performance vs oxygen consumption. your power can improve at 97 and 98 % but not without losing o2 and efficiency. his case studies at the time were done with the several of the top pros and lasted a minimum of 1 year.
be warned....this guy is as hard core/old school as they come. he suggests you ride your bike everywhere and as hard as you can all the time. he also suggests that your food be eaten raw. that's right. meat, poultry, and fish......raw. as soon as you cook something, you loose the nutritional value of the food. here's some links on the book..

Eddie B. was the first national coaching director of the USCF; from 1980 through 1984 he was the U.S. Olympic Cycling Coach. He remains the best-known coach on the American cycling scene.

http://www.stevenscreek.com/books/eddieb.html

http://www.amazon.ca/Bicycle-Road-Racing-Edward-Borysewicz/dp/0941950077
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
49 Posts
MerlinAma said:
http://www.competitivecyclist.com/pdf/fit_details.pdf

Wear your cycling shorts, and take the measurements in bare feet.
1. Inseam
Set your feet approximately 8" apart and straddle a straight edge – something like a square or a 2' level is ideal. Put as much pressure on your crotch as you feel when sitting on your bike seat. Measure the distance from the top of the level to the ground. Alternatively, mark the wall, then step away and take the measurement of the mark to the ground. And whatever you do, please don't use the inseam measurement from your Levi's! Pants inseams are at least 2" shorter than your actual inseam.


There are numerous techniques for determining your ideal size and fit, the most widely accepted of which is the "Lemond method", as set forth by Greg Lemond in his classic late-80's book "The Complete Book of Bicycling". The Lemond method provides the logic and the math behind virtually every bike fitting system you'll encounter. Whether your fitting is performed in a retail environment with tools such as Bio-Racer, the Fit Stik or the Fit Kit, or if you've derived your fit from a database-driven on-line fitting system, certain truths almost always hold true:
1. You will always be asked for your inseam, and you will always be provided with the following conclusions:
a. Your center-to-center seat tube will equal (inseam x 0.65).
b. Your center-to-top seat tube will equal (inseam x 0.67).
c. Your bb-saddle height will equal (inseam x 0.883).
I recently adjusted my saddle to this height calculation and found that I was nearly two inches too high. This adjustment really helped my knees/hamstrings feel better (I did the same on my mtb).
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,620 Posts
bluebug32 said:
I recently adjusted my saddle to this height calculation and found that I was nearly two inches too high. This adjustment really helped my knees/hamstrings feel better (I did the same on my mtb).
I'm not a professional bike fitter but I did stay at a Holiday Inn Express.............:D

Seriously - I'm glad that worked for you.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,140 Posts
ganginwood said:
sounds like you need the eddie borysewicz book. another late 80's staple, similar to lemond's. a friend loaned me his a few moths ago. pretty interesteing read. he's found that the ideal position is 96%. but there is a speciic formula to achieve that 96%. he takes into accout the sole of your cleats, crank legnth, even the pad in your chamois. if you were a different chamois,,,,,,you need to remeasure. at 96 % you're gaining the optimal performance vs oxygen consumption. your power can improve at 97 and 98 % but not without losing o2 and efficiency. his case studies at the time were done with the several of the top pros and lasted a minimum of 1 year.
be warned....this guy is as hard core/old school as they come. he suggests you ride your bike everywhere and as hard as you can all the time. he also suggests that your food be eaten raw. that's right. meat, poultry, and fish......raw. as soon as you cook something, you loose the nutritional value of the food. here's some links on the book..
This is over simplyfing Eddies coaching a great deal. He also recommends rest days and other things as well. He is great at fitting he did my first real fit and where he put my saddle height has pretty mush remained where he set it.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
2,009 Posts
I use and have used the LeMond calculation and find it to be extremely accurate and a great starting point. Though when you raise the saddle, mark it with painter's tape at the seat clamp, and only move it up 1/4"-1/2" as you stretching a tendon in the back of the leg and ankle and you have to be careful of developing tendonitis.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
21,832 Posts
Too much

lawrence said:
only move it up 1/4"-1/2" as you stretching a tendon in the back of the leg and ankle and you have to be careful of developing tendonitis.
1/4" (6 mm) is on the outside of how much to move the saddle in any given adjustment. Half that distance is more appropriate. Moving the saddle up or down 1/2" (12 mm) at a time is likely to cause significant problems for anyone riding hard or doing distance.
 
1 - 14 of 14 Posts
This is an older thread, you may not receive a response, and could be reviving an old thread. Please consider creating a new thread.
Top