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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I am looking at getting a road bike to do some training for the upcoming Scott 24hr MTB race in Canberra. I have had a look at a few different bikes, and the best spec'd bike for the money I have to spend is a Giant TCR Aero 1. On Giants website they list this as a triathlon bike, and I know that the geometry on these type of bikes is different.

Does anyone konw if this style of bike is vastly different to a standard road bike? Some peopel say it won't make any difference to the ride, others say it will...... I will be using it for training only, no racing, and no triathlons.

Should I be looking at a more traditional road bike??????
Any info or ideas is much appreciated.
 

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You're Not the Boss of Me
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I don't mean to be stupid and I'm not being sarcastic, but if you are training for a mountain bike endurance event, why not train on a mountain bike? Be on the geometry and the saddle that you'll be on for the big event, seems to me.

What am I missing?
 

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jtolleson said:
I don't mean to be stupid and I'm not being sarcastic, but if you are training for a mountain bike endurance event, why not train on a mountain bike? Be on the geometry and the saddle that you'll be on for the big event, seems to me.

What am I missing?
Most top level mountain bikers train on the road about 70% of the time, on road bikes. A road bike is more effecient, has more hand positions, and is designed for long training rides. A mountain bike isn't.

To answer the original question, a regular road bike would probably serve you best. It gives the widest amount of options for usage and will still be useful after you have finished training for the 24 hour event. As long as you don't buy a bike that's too twitchy you can also add some aero bars on a regular road bike for even more positions.
 

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danj said:
I am looking at getting a road bike to do some training for the upcoming Scott 24hr MTB race in Canberra. I have had a look at a few different bikes, and the best spec'd bike for the money I have to spend is a Giant TCR Aero 1. On Giants website they list this as a triathlon bike, and I know that the geometry on these type of bikes is different.

Does anyone konw if this style of bike is vastly different to a standard road bike? Some peopel say it won't make any difference to the ride, others say it will...... I will be using it for training only, no racing, and no triathlons.

Should I be looking at a more traditional road bike??????
Any info or ideas is much appreciated.
If you just want it for road-training for your main MTB efforts, about any halfway decent basic roadbike will do you. A Tri / timetrial bike like that Giant you mention is a specialist machine aimed at a specialist event done by someone who knows how to handle these machines.

Or it's bought by an utter wally who has to spend money "just because" and goes around being a risk to anyone on the same street.

A good, average road bike, Shimano 105 or whatever the Campag equivalent is (to stave off a range feud :rolleyes: ) equipped, decently fitted to you will do you fine. Get the same pedals as your MTB, so you can use your regular shoes - you've already got a skidlid you like ( I hope :eek: ). Would suggest a pair of decent road shorts and jersey - not so much "looking the part" as getting the right tools to do the job.

Something with a decent enough name - Trek, Giant, Fuji, spring to mind because my LBS sell them by the hundreds. Cost bracket around $800 - $1000. Go to a real bike shop, rather than something like Performance and get fitted by someone who understands road riding.

If you go internet, be prepared to know far more than the goons on the other end and to get the aftermarket service you pay for - :mad2:

Don't get too wound up about your road bike - it's only a training tool for your main aim. You mostly want it to be a decent fit and work.

Hope that helps, good luck

Dereck
Who starts to hate his bike after four hours, and regards anyone doing 24 hours of anything with awe
 

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Wookiebiker: Most top level mountain bikers train on the road about 70% of the time, on road bikes. A road bike is more effecient, has more hand positions, and is designed for long training rides. A mountain bike isn't.

Actually, the main reason us mountain bikers train on road bikes are:

1) far less impact on the body
2) easier to have a specific training strategy (intervals especially)

I ride (and race) a rigid singlespeed mountain bike, so when I am talking about impact to the body, I really mean it. I use my full suspension bike and the road bike to literally give my body a chance to recuperate.
 

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serious said:
Wookiebiker: Most top level mountain bikers train on the road about 70% of the time, on road bikes. A road bike is more efficient, has more hand positions, and is designed for long training rides. A mountain bike isn't.

Actually, the main reason us mountain bikers train on road bikes are:

1) far less impact on the body
2) easier to have a specific training strategy (intervals especially)

I ride (and race) a rigid singlespeed mountain bike, so when I am talking about impact to the body, I really mean it. I use my full suspension bike and the road bike to literally give my body a chance to recuperate.
Those are additional reasons why to train on the the road, but doesn't answer jtolleson's question: why not just use the MTB to train on the road instead of purchasing a seperate road bike.

The Pro's use road bikes for their road training for the additional comfort and ability to ride longer distances than on their mountain bikes. The road bike also gives better gearing than a MTB with slicks when training on the road.

I suspect that danj is looking for a road bike to allow for longer training rides without the beating he gets riding off road a lot. His question was which would be better: a road bike or a Tri-Bike. Considering danj is training for a 24 hour race a regular road bike will be a better option than a Tri-Bike.
 

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I used to wave
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What he said..

Prolly more then 70%.. Most all my true training for mtb racing is done on the road, as do most of my competition. So much easier on the rider and equipment, as well as applying a typical training regime, as described above. Also easier to ride from your door as always. Also cooler during the in season months. How many have singletrack close by even if they wanted to train offroad? I race XC most every weekend this time of year, with TTs sometimes during the week(then some 12/24 hour events mixed in all season). Thats my intensity and mtbing for the week right there. Most all else is on the road.

I'm doing a 12 hour endurance solo effort next weekend. Many long road rides in the N Ga mtns the last 3-4 months were all done with that in mind.

Just chiming in I guess.

Duck
 

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to answer the question, def a road bike...

a TT / tri bike puts more of your weight forward and tucks you in for the most aero position, obviously this has little in common with MTB posture.

Since your source seems to stock giant.. have a look at the OCR range, its a bit more upright and focuses on comfort in a road configuration (still very much a road bike, but will have the posture most in common with a MTB).... should fit the bill nicely... pretty well priced too !

cheers,

joe
 

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wankski said:
to answer the question, def a road bike...

a TT / tri bike puts more of your weight forward and tucks you in for the most aero position, obviously this has little in common with MTB posture.

Since your source seems to stock giant.. have a look at the OCR range, its a bit more upright and focuses on comfort in a road configuration (still very much a road bike, but will have the posture most in common with a MTB).... should fit the bill nicely... pretty well priced too !

cheers,

joe
This is good advice. Look at a Giant OCR 1 with 105 f/r. It'll probably be the best spec for the money and should do what you need very well.

I have a tri bike - it would not be a good choice for your needs as its less comfortable than standard road geometry, has a bit trickier handling, and will usually be significantly more expensive than a comparably spec'd road bike.
 

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Wookiebiker,

You are right, I chose my words rather poorly there. As for the bike, I would guess a road bike is a better (more versatile) choice.

O25 dude,

I never owned a pure TT bike, but I always thought that TT bikes have slaker geometry, more wheel base length and thus more 'stable' handling. Not true? I am asking because you said that they are trickier to handle. Just trying to get educated here.
 

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I never owned a pure TT bike, but I always thought that TT bikes have slaker geometry, more wheel base length and thus more 'stable' handling. Not true? I am asking because you said that they are trickier to handle. Just trying to get educated here.[/QUOTE]

No, the opposite is true. True TT or tri bikes have seat tube angles of up to 78 degrees. My Cervelo has about the slackest geometry you'll find in a tri bike at 74.5 deg. Standard road geometry is around 73.5 for my size. The steep angle puts more weight on the front tire, changing their handling characteristics.

I like my Cervelo, but tri bikes don't make the best day-to-day rides. Unless you plan to do a LOT of triathlons, get a standard road bike.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thanks for all your replies. I have decided to go for a felt F80 road bike with the shimano R550 wheelset as an upgrade.:thumbsup:

Does anyone have any positive or negative feedback about this bike?
 

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O25 dude,

Thanks for the information. Now I know to stay away from TT bikes. :D

danj,

Congratulation on the bike purchase. I know nothing about Felt bikes, but I do have the R550 tires myself. Yes, they are a little flexy when you hammer out of the saddle, but in 1100km or riding I have yet to service them in any way. They have stayed true since they came out of the shop, even though one often has to re-tension spokes after the first couple of rides on a new bike. Mind you, I am 165lbs and the roads I ride are generally well maintained.
 

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Wookiebiker said:
Most top level mountain bikers train on the road about 70% of the time, on road bikes. A road bike is more effecient, has more hand positions, and is designed for long training rides. A mountain bike isn't.


He is training for a 24 hour event he needs to be comfortable on the mountain bike for long periods of time. The cannondale bad boy came to be by copying the race team using 700c wheels on their mtn. bikes for training. Since disc brakes, this option is widely used now. If I was the OP I would build up a set of 700c road wheels with 135mm rear hub and train on those. UNless he doesn't have disc brakes then a conventional road bike would be best. Just use the same length cranks and saddle. also set up the reach so tops of bars are in same spot as on your mountain bike.
 
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