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Discussion Starter #1
I currently am looking to getting a new bike so i can start getting into the sport more. However, i am on a budget. I have four bikes, currently in mind. I was wondering which one you all think is the best. Also, feel free to suggest any bikes. My price range is around $1000.

The four bikes are the following:
  1. 2005 Giant OCR1 for $1000
  2. 2006 Mercier Serpens for $1095
  3. 2006 Motobecane Century Pro for $1050
  4. 2005 LeMond Alpe d'Huez for $700 or $800

Thanks
 

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well my little troll...

which ever one suits you the best, I suppose. Of course there are some nice Huffys and Columbias at WalMart.


runnerboy16 said:
I currently am looking to getting a new bike so i can start getting into the sport more. However, i am on a budget. I have four bikes, currently in mind. I was wbias ondering which one you all think is the best. Also, feel free to suggest any bikes. My price range is around $1000.

The four bikes are the following:
  1. 2005 Giant OCR1 for $1000
  2. 2006 Mercier Serpens for $1095
  3. 2006 Motobecane Century Pro for $1050
  4. 2005 LeMond Alpe d'Huez for $700 or $800

Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter #3
elvisVerde said:
which ever one suits you the best, I suppose. Of course there are some nice Huffys and Columbias at WalMart.
I am going to go with one of those four bikes probably...so i would like it if some people would tell me negatives/positives about each bike.
Thanks
 

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Discussion Starter #4
Boardmill said:
Isn't it completely obvious: the Giant LeMond Serpens Century Pro, now that is one bad ass machine. You can't do better then having a Pro level bike, that rips centuries, enorsed by a Giant in the cycling industry like LeMond. Cap it off with that sick Serpent graphic and you are good to go (yeah its a stretch of Serpens).

I would be more worried about the little trailer with the bed you are going to have to tow around. Regardless of your gender preference, when you ride through on that bike, your groupies will not relent until you satisfy them right then and there.

UM....Those are totally seperate bikes that i am looking at...i am only getting one. The Giant bike is the OCR1. Dont know if you understood the question.
 

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Isn't it completely obvious: the Giant LeMond Serpens Century Pro, now that is one bad ass machine. You can't do better then having a Pro level bike, that rips centuries, enorsed by a Giant in the cycling industry like LeMond. Cap it off with that sick Serpent graphic and you are good to go (yeah its a stretch of Serpens).

I would be more worried about the little trailer with the bed you are going to have to tow around. Regardless of your gender preference, when you ride through on that bike, your groupies will not relent until you satisfy them right then and there.
 

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Eh..

They are messing around because every 5 minutes someone asks what bike is the best out of a very diverse and similarly priced group. If the bike you want doesn't cost half as much as a Honda Civic, chances are you will get worthless posts, similar to those above, and to some extent this post. In order for people to get excited around here they need to discuss a bike that they have never ridden but they "know a guy who...(insert pedantic chatter about some stranger's bicycle".
In that price-range the best thing to do is test ride all of the bikes on your list, then when you think you found what you want buy-look for a deal on that bike. There are no quantitative factors that some one can tell in an internet forum you that will overcome your own qualitative judgement. Buying a bike is hard, which is mostly due to the initial expense-do your best to find what you can afford and take the plunge. If you can't decide then look at used bikes to broaden your search.
It's easy to know which parts specs' are better than others but that doesn't take into account any of the characteristics of the frame, build quality, or the LBS quality...
 

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Runnerboy, your original post was kind of funny, like you were looking to jerk us around, hence the two smart ass replies you got. It looks like you are legit, so sorry about that.

All the bikes you mention seem like good candidates for you and could work well. The advise you are likely to get here is: get fit at a good shop, take some out for a spin, then decide.

IMO, what is going to make the difference for you is having someone who is knowledgable and sitting right there with you on a bike making sure it looks good. If you want to get into the sport you are going to need to find something you feel comfortable on. This is equally true on a $600 bike as it is on a $6,000 bike.

A different derailure here, crankset there, etc. is not going to matter much if you are uncomfortable on your bike. A fitting and a quick spin will narrow your choices down to probably two bikes. At that point just do what everyone else does: get the one that looks the coolest (or the best bang for the buck if you are sensible).
 

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Discussion Starter #8
Boardmill said:
Runnerboy, your original post was kind of funny, like you were looking to jerk us around, hence the two smart ass replies you got.
Sry about sounding like a jerk :( . I was in a hurry when i was making that post. I have already been to a bike shop and looked around and talked to them. I have also rode (recreationally) before on a old Schwinn Le tour, just not competitivly (*SP?). I have also a friend who bikes and his dad has helped me a lot. I also realize that people make the same types of posts over and over, so sry for doing it myself, without realizing it. I know about the bikes(not saying this in a cocky type of way), and what components they have. I know that the Ultegra is better than the 105 parts and the Dura Ace is the best. I have learnt these in the past few weeks. I was just hoping that some one, who owned/roded one of these bikes would tell me their opinions, just to help me learn more. And maybe spot a weakness that my noobish self wouldnt catch or realize.

Again, sry if I sounded like a jerk. I didnt mean too. I am not here to make enemies. I am here so i can learn about cycling and make friends possibly, and get more into the sport of cycling. So i hope no offense was taken

(in my third post, i honestly didnt know if you knew that. I figured you were joking but just wanted to make sure. Also i have looked at the bikes at walmart.)

Thanks.
Matthew
 

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Hey, welcome to the passion and all that.

As just beginners -- as I still am, but have clocked up more than 10,000 miles in the past year -- there's only so much that we CAN know about what we'll like about a bike. Subtle geometry and stiffness differences aren't going to be perceptible.

At this level, the frames aren't going to be that different, and the components will all be of a similar quality.

I'd stay away from the motobecanes unless you're already a good wrench, 'cause that means buying online. A local bike shop that will give you discounts on service, free stem-length swaps, and the like, will really help.

Consider your plan of action with this bike, present and future, to decide things like whether you'd like a triple and how aggressive of a set-up to go with.

That's about it. Until you've gotten that first 5,000 - 10,000 miles of serious training, I don't think you'll really know what you like. At least, I didn't.
 

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Argentius said:
I'd stay away from the motobecanes unless you're already a good wrench, 'cause that means buying online. A local bike shop that will give you discounts on service, free stem-length swaps, and the like, will really help.
This would also apply to the Mercier. With any bicycle from BikesDirect, great deal if you do all your own work. Nothing wrong with their component choices or frames, despite what others may say on this or other forums. But they do come mostly disassembled and some things require tools or expertise that a beginner may not have. A LBS may also frown on working with an online purchased bike and not be as willing to help make sure you get the most of your bicycle dollar choice.
 
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