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Discussion Starter #1
Hi.

I need some help since I can't make up my mind. I was about to get a new road bike, a Steven Izoard Pro 2020 model which has a carbon frame, disc brakes, Ultegra 8000 for 2499 Euro.
https://www.stevensbikes.de/2020/index.php?bik_id=212&cou=DE&lang=de_DE

By coincidence I noticed a bike hanging from the ceiling. It turned out to be a Stevens Xenon 2017 model with a carbon frame, Di2 shifting(but Ultegra 6800), rim brakes and it's pretty lightweight: 6.9kg. It also has a better wheelset.
https://stevensbikes.de/2017/index.php?bik_id=15&cou=BE&lang=cs_CZ

Normally the 2017 model costs 1000 Euro more but I could get it for the same price of the 2020 cheaper model.

It's really a tough decision. One bike is really lightweight and has Di2 shifting but it's close to 4 years old, and the other has normal shifting but disc-brakes and is this year's model.

I tested both and both feel great.
Any recommendations? Thanks.
 

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I don't think anyone can answer that for you. What I would choose is pretty irrelevant to what you would choose. The bikes are kinda apples to oranges in comparison.

The choice is pretty much: do you want Di2 or Disc. do you want a lighter or heavier bike.
 

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Discussion Starter #3 (Edited)
I realize that but to simplify the question:

Would you rather have a bike with rim brakes and Di2 gears
or disc brakes with mechanical gears?

The reason I can't really say myself is because my road bikes all had rim brakes and mechanical gears. I'm not picking one of these new bikes for disc or Di2 but rather because they come with one of the two anyway. I just wanted to know what feature most people would prefer over the other as an extra help to make a decision.
 

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I realize that but to simplify the question:

Would you rather have a bike with rim brakes and Di2 gears
or disc brakes with mechanical gears?
Yes... that is the simple question. What does it matter what I want? Do I ride in the rain? Do I ride in hilly areas or flat areas?

Without knowing your riding conditions or my riding conditions it's completely irrelevant what my preference is.
 

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Would you rather have a bike with rim brakes and Di2 gears
or disc brakes with mechanical gears?
After a few decades of riding, I have a large selection of rim brake wheels. For that reason, I would prefer a rim brake frame so I could take advantage of using those wheels. Do you have a large selection of rim brake wheels? If not, my decision and reasoning have no relevance to you.
 

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Discussion Starter #6
To be honest, if the bike I wanted to get had rim brakes and mechanical gears, I would get it because my previous bikes have it and I never had a problem with it. I can live without disc brakes and Di2.

The two bikes in the shop just happen to have either disc brakes or Di2 gears. The Di2 has the better frame and the better wheelset which is why I'll probably get that bike but it is a 3-4 years old model(still un-used tho) but I'm still on the edge. I just thought if someone could see a solid reason to get one or the other bike it would have helped me decide.
 

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Yes... that is the simple question. What does it matter what I want? Do I ride in the rain? Do I ride in hilly areas or flat areas?

Without knowing your riding conditions or my riding conditions it's completely irrelevant what my preference is.
Yep, need more information if you want input that is worth anything really
 

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I can live without disc brakes and Di2.

The Di2 has the better frame and the better wheelset which is why I'll probably get that bike but it is a 3-4 years old model(still un-used tho)
Since you can live without the perks on either bike, is one of them more aesthetically pleasing than the other? If not, I'd probably go for the newer bike. If the older model has a "better" frame and wheel set I'd always wonder why it's been sitting around in a shop for more than 3 years.
 

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I can live without disc brakes and Di2.
Lots of people have said that exact same thing. Then they got disc and/or Di2... and said they can't live without.
Personally... I would never own a bike without Di2. .
I have bikes with disc. I have bikes with rim. My next bike may have one or the other. But probably disc.

None of that helps you one bit.

I just thought if someone could see a solid reason to get one or the other bike it would have helped me decide.
Nope. There is no solid choice. Both bikes have merit. It's a personal decision you have to make.
 

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Discussion Starter #10
If the older model has a "better" frame and wheel set I'd always wonder why it's been sitting around in a shop for more than 3 years.
That's a good question I asked myself and still do but one reason might be the the frame size which is small. I'm 5' 9'' and have shorter legs so that size fits me.
The shop only has 2020 road bikes in that size left because due to Covid most bikes are sold out.
Also, the majority of bikes the shop has are Gravel bikes which seem to be their main seller.
Also, most bikes nowadays have disc brakes.

I guess a rather expensive bike(3600 Euro) with a small frame, and rim brakes might not have been what most people are looking for. The reviews of that bike are quite good. I admit that question is probably why I'm asking in the first place.
 

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Discussion Starter #11
Lots of people have said that exact same thing. Then they got disc and/or Di2... and said they can't live without.
Personally... I would never own a bike without Di2.
Actually, after I took both bikes for a test ride I had more of a 'Wow' feeling on the Di2 bike because I really liked the shifting compared to mechanical shifting. I felt like saying "take my money already". The only thing that gives me doubts is that it is close to 4 years old. I'm not sure if 4 year old Di2 brakes are out-dated or if they're just as good.
 

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Since you can live without the perks on either bike, is one of them more aesthetically pleasing than the other? If not, I'd probably go for the newer bike. If the older model has a "better" frame and wheel set I'd always wonder why it's been sitting around in a shop for more than 3 years.
Sometimes it's just market, price, trends, people. When I lived in Bakersfield, the shop I primarily dealt with would get quite a few high end frame. Back in 92 they got in a Paramount frame. They wanted $950 for it. It sat on their wall for 2 years. In 94 the manager asked if I would be interested and he would give it to me for shop price. Now would you say that back in 94 that anything coming out of Trek, Spec, C'dale, Giant would ride so much better than the Paramount? I wouldn't and didn't. I still have the Paramount.

When I was in Vegas, one of the shops had a Ellsworth Truth built up. All top of the line; top of the line fork, disk brakes, great wheelset, full xtr. They wanted a ton of money for. Was the bike worth it? Yes, but it was expensive and at the time Vegas was extremely trendy. When Litespeeds were popular, everybody rode Litespeeds. When Pinarellos were popular, everybody rode Pinarellos. In a sea of mediocre Treks somebody could have had one of the best full suspension rigs out there but it just sat and sat. Part of it was the shop's fault. After sitting for 3 years they still wanted full price. It sat for another year or two and they finally dropped it to half price. Somebody bought but by then it was almost 5 yrs old.
 

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Discussion Starter #13
Part of it was the shop's fault. After sitting for 3 years they still wanted full price. It sat for another year or two and they finally dropped it to half price. Somebody bought but by then it was almost 5 yrs old.
This sounds familiar. The price on the bike is still the full retail price. After I asked about the bike, one of the employees had to get it off the ceiling. It was hanging on two ropes almost like decoration so I guess not many people even noticed the bike.

After I took it for a test ride and couldn't decide, the employee said he could knock off about 15-20%. I said I'll sleep over it.
After I came back I wanted to test it again and to compare it to the 2020 disc bike, they suddenly knocked off another 10-15%.
 

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Actually, after I took both bikes for a test ride I had more of a 'Wow' feeling on the Di2 bike because I really liked the shifting compared to mechanical shifting. I felt like saying "take my money already". The only thing that gives me doubts is that it is close to 4 years old. I'm not sure if 4 year old Di2 brakes are out-dated or if they're just as good.
What version of Di2 is it? I know there's been two versions of the 11-speed mechanical (9000 and 9100). I would have no issues buying a bike that's a few years old. All the bikes I ride are several years old. I wouldn't expect to pay MSRP for it though. I'd take Di2 and better wheels over disc brakes any day of the week.
 

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Actually, after I took both bikes for a test ride I had more of a 'Wow' feeling on the Di2 bike because I really liked the shifting compared to mechanical shifting. I felt like saying "take my money already".
Sure, that initial feeling is great. But that's not really the greatness of Di2 IMO. Brand new mechanical shifting is really nice too. But... Di2 feels exactly the same after 100km... 1000km... 10,000km... 20,000km. Shifting is never degraded by worn housing, frayed cables, or dirty/gunky cables. I have 5yrs on Di2 with 3 different bikes. I've never once adjusted a derailleur. Never replaced a cable. Shifting has always been perfect as day one.


The only thing that gives me doubts is that it is close to 4 years old. I'm not sure if 4 year old Di2 brakes are out-dated or if they're just as good.
There is no such thing as Di2 brakes. They're the same brakes used on mechanical.
The BR-6800 are great. The newer BR-8000 are better, but I'd have no doubts riding the 6800's.
 

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Discussion Starter #17
Di2 feels exactly the same after 100km... 1000km... 10,000km... 20,000km. Shifting is never degraded by worn housing, frayed cables, or dirty/gunky cables. I have 5yrs on Di2 with 3 different bikes. I've never once adjusted a derailleur. Never replaced a cable. Shifting has always been perfect as day one.
The BR-6800 are great. The newer BR-8000 are better, but I'd have no doubts riding the 6800's.
Thanks. That's really useful information.
 

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All else the same, I would go for the Di2 so you don't have to worry about the rear DR shifter cable replacement every 2000-6000 miles depending on how much you shift and how well you maintain it. There are a few tthings that the older 6800 Di2 doesn't have that the newer series has

1. The battery doesn't support the wireless module to transmit gear postion and battery charge etc to your cycling head unit. That's an easy swap though assuming its an internal battery, cost under $100 for the battery if you shop around.

2. The rear DR doesn't have the ability to keep you from small / small (also requires the newer battery) like the newer versions do (Gear control)

3. You don't get hidden buttons on the Brifter (just to annoy CXwrench :) ) for auto switching screens on your computer or other functions you can choose (some require the wireless module noted in #1.)

There won't be any difference in the quality of shifting though and you can always change parts later if you feel you really want missing functionality and it's worth the cost of the upgrades. All the 6800 Di2 parts are compatible with the newer versions out today.

The only thing undesirable about mechanical shifting is the rear DR cable replacement which you have to stay on top of or it will break and leave you just able to shift the front on a ride, and probably leave you in a smaller cog on the rear which can make some hills pretty tough.
 

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If you regularly ride in rain or on wet roads, get the disc brake bike.

If you ride only in dry conditions, your pick.

Personally, I'm not a fan of e-shifting, but then again, I'm not a fan of changing the rear cable every 1500-2000 miles, which is an issue with Shimano mechanical shifters of the last 3 generations. If I had to do it over again, I would go SRAM Force 22 mechanical. That may happen when I get sick and tired of changing rear shifter cables so often.
 

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Discussion Starter #20
I ended up getting the Di2 bike and don't regret it. I took my new bike for a ride yesterday and it was great.
Today it was pouring. I was on my old bike that also has rim brakes. Although it was raining so hard that I could hardly see anything with water in my eyes, the brakes worked just fine.

Thanks for all the answers. They were all really helpful.
 
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