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· I Type, Therefore I Am
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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
Made a grocery run this morning. While not a full blown ride-report, I thought it was interesting how much stuff I was able to get into my grocery panniers.
Pic 1: Loaded for the ride home
Pic 2: Here's what was inside. Yes, that's two 18 count egg cartons (they were buy one, get one free) and 10 pounds of sugar (it's was on sale too).
 

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It must be great combining getting in base mileage w/ not having to pay bin Ladin's cousins $5 to get those groceries. Thanks for the demonstration.

Do you mind mentioning the brands of the rack & panniers?
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
lx93 said:
Do you mind mentioning the brands of the rack & panniers?
Rack is a Performance brand, panniers are Novara (from REI). Nothing special, but they get the job done.
Rack: Trans it? It's many years old. I think they have changed the design as I couldn't find an exact match on the Performance site
Panniers: http://www.rei.com/product/733820
 

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I sold my car a year and a half ago when I moved to chicago, and bought a road bike a couple months later. I have had no desire to drive since, and don't feel like Im missing out on anything. Most of my friends/coworkers ride bikes too, all over the city, most of us on fixed gears.

Last time I went grocery shopping, I fit about a weeks worth of groceries in my messenger bag. I work in a kitchen and mostly eat for free though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
randi_526 said:
I fit about a weeks worth of groceries in my messenger bag.
A week's worth of groceries for a family of four don't fit in a messenger bag. You just have to make more trips is all!
 

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This weekend I biked home with:

1 loaf of bread
4 oranges
1 box of cereal
2 pounds of brown rice
1.5 pounds of chicken breasts
1.5 pounds of salmon fillet
2 bunches of bok choi
1 pound of sliced turkey
24 ounces of dried pasta
1/2 gallon of soy milk
1 quart of buttermilk
1 pint of blueberries

That was pretty much the limit. I had to strap the loaf of bread to the top of my rack bag. The bike was bit squirrelly but fine for the 2 mile ride home!
 
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The heat!

How do you keep the frozen stuff from thawing out, or even the cold stuff -- yogurt, milk -- from getting warm on a grocery run on a summer day?

Where I live, it reaches the 90s pretty fast.

I live about half an hour by bike from the story (maybe more, once loaded -- I've never tried it).

I'd like to try this, but I'm concerned about the quality of the food by the time I get to the house.
 

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Slim Again said:
How do you keep the frozen stuff from thawing out, or even the cold stuff -- yogurt, milk -- from getting warm on a grocery run on a summer day?

Where I live, it reaches the 90s pretty fast.

I live about half an hour by bike from the story (maybe more, once loaded -- I've never tried it).

I'd like to try this, but I'm concerned about the quality of the food by the time I get to the house.
It's not really a problem- yer messenger bag (or pannier) holds the cold in a little as well as keeping yer frozen goods out of the sun.

Try it the first time without frozen stuff.
 

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I'm pretty sure it doesn't take me more than 5 minutes longer to get home from the grocery store on a bike than it does in my car. I just keep cold things together so they can help each other stay cooler longer. Really I'm just talking about 15 minutes from store to home so it's not a problem. Milk and juice are still cold to the touch when I arrive home. Frozen foods, still frozen.

My grocery also sells insulated bags on the frozen food isle that gurantee that things stay cold. I'm sure those could be used to assist in a longer commute home.

My trunk bag in also insulated, and will keep ice for 6 hours or more inside a hot truck in the 100 degree heat. I was very impressed with how long it kept ice frozen. It's Avenger Brand.
 

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Frozen

Slim Again said:
How do you keep the frozen stuff from thawing out, or even the cold stuff -- yogurt, milk -- from getting warm on a grocery run on a summer day?

Where I live, it reaches the 90s pretty fast.

I live about half an hour by bike from the story (maybe more, once loaded -- I've never tried it).

I'd like to try this, but I'm concerned about the quality of the food by the time I get to the house.
The first time I used the bike for the store, I was concerned about this. So, I took a soft cooler with a blue ice pack in addition to the bag I use on the rack. The bag by the way is a motorcycle tailback I already had, it fits perfectly in my rear rack and it has its own bungee cords. I put the cold stuff in the cooler then strapped the tail pack on top. Other than giving me more space it really wasn't needed. I don't usually take the cooler now. It takes me less than an hour to ride to the store, shop and get back home so I have no problem.

My only problem is over buying. I have the same problem on the motorcycle though, I try to be careful with how much I buy but each time I go out to the bike I have a fun time packing it all in. :) The other day I threw a small backpack in my tail pack since I knew I needed toilet paper. I also bought more than I anticipated but was able to fit it all in.

Cheers,
Phil
 

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Mr Wood said:
Made a grocery run this morning. While not a full blown ride-report, I thought it was interesting how much stuff I was able to get into my grocery panniers.
Pic 1: Loaded for the ride hoe
Pic 2: Here's what was inside. Yes, that's two 18 count egg cartons (they were buy one, get one free) and 10 pounds of sugar (it's was on sale too).
that's quite the interesting diet you have:eek:
 

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Mr Wood said:
Made a grocery run this morning. While not a full blown ride-report, I thought it was interesting how much stuff I was able to get into my grocery panniers.
Pic 1: Loaded for the ride hoe
I think the most interesting part is that you have a ride hoe. Where do I get one and where exactly does she sit on the bike? I won't even comment on the way you described your ride report :shocked:
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
PBike said:
I think the most interesting part is that you have a ride hoe. Where do I get one and where exactly does she sit on the bike? I won't even comment on the way you described your ride report :shocked:
HA! Fixed
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Slim Again said:
How do you keep the frozen stuff from thawing out, or even the cold stuff -- yogurt, milk -- from getting warm on a grocery run on a summer day?

Where I live, it reaches the 90s pretty fast.

I live about half an hour by bike from the story (maybe more, once loaded -- I've never tried it).

I'd like to try this, but I'm concerned about the quality of the food by the time I get to the house.
The grocery store I go to is less than five minutes by bike. If you are concerned, get a soft sided cooler. My grocery store sells them. They are the same size as the re-usable grocery bags they sell. They fit perfectly inside these panniers, like they were made for them. Do a test run with a pint of ice cream or something and see what happens.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
PBike said:
My only problem is over buying.
I take the panniers off the bike and take them into the store with me. As I shop, I load the items into the panniers. When your panniers are full, stop shopping.
 
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