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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Haven't done a tri in a couple of years. Longest one was a couple of 1/2 ironmans. However, the training with smaller kids (youngest was 3 at the time) was a bit too much. Got back into racing mountain bikes (one discipline) and I'm pretty much enjoying things.

Then this big old wrench comes flying at me last night when the wife says: "Why don't you do a full ironman?"
My response: "Cause I can't train the way I'd need to with the kids."
Wifes rebuttle: "They were younger then, you'd have time now. Plus I know you could do it and I think it's a waste if you don't try."
Well yippidee dee whoo! (I didn't say that out loud)

So, I haven't ran in 2 1/2 years, but I have kept up with the swimming (some) and do a lot of biking.

My question is: What sort of time table would you put into picking a date that you'd feel comfortable with (assuming you have a solid base to start with). The tri I'd picked out to do a couple of years ago is in mid-September. I don't know that 13 months would be a far off target, but would prefer to get something a little sooner if possible.

Advice welcomed....
 

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Are you training to finish or training to finish well? With a decent base, you don't need 13 months just to finish. On the other hand if you have a time in mind, 13 months might not be enough.
 

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Frankly, I think it would be idiotic to set a date for the Iron. Instead, set a date for your first sprint tri, preferably about a month from now.

Start running today. 15 minutes. From now on, you never finish a ride without running off the bike for at least 10 minutes.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
pretender said:
Frankly, I think it would be idiotic to set a date for the Iron. Instead, set a date for your first sprint tri, preferably about a month from now.

Start running today. 15 minutes. From now on, you never finish a ride without running off the bike for at least 10 minutes.
Okay Pretender, I've not always agreed with how you state things, but do appreciate your overall intentions.

So, explain why setting a date is wrong? You have to have something slated to gear for in my opinion. This is how I've handled any/every race I've ever done - so why would this be any different?


kbiker3111: I don't have a goal (yet). I think I'd be a bit silly to expect anything for my first long distance to be anything other than a finish. (However, I know that this will change once I start training.)
 

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SlowMo said:
So, explain why setting a date is wrong? You have to have something slated to gear for in my opinion. This is how I've handled any/every race I've ever done - so why would this be any different?
Well, I'll admit that the typical approach is "Set a date and work backwards." Many people have finished IMs, marathons, etc, with such an approach, but it's all too common for people to get into downward spirals of injury, lack of motivation, procrastination ("I'll start running next week!"), mediocre results, and short-term interest by taking this route.

I think it's far better to focus on the next thing you have to do, rather than the final thing. And since you haven't run in over two years, guess what that next thing is.

I know two people who are planning on doing IM Louisville. They are both suffering from running injuries, because they ramped up their running volume too sharply, because of the IM. They "set the date and worked backwards" but reality seems to be getting in the way of their best-laid plans.

I'm not saying you shouldn't have the IM as a long-term goal, but you should focus on first things first.
 

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the whole point of setting a date is to structure a progressive training plan - overuse injuries aren't caused by setting a date. They're caused by not having a proper training plan. Step 1 is to set the date, structure a sensible plan around it, and follow it...
 

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stevesbike said:
the whole point of setting a date is to structure a progressive training plan - overuse injuries aren't caused by setting a date. They're caused by not having a proper training plan. Step 1 is to set the date, structure a sensible plan around it, and follow it...
Any training plan that tells you exactly how much you're going to be training six months from now isn't sensible. Such plans are based on a faulty premise, namely that you should train according to how fit you want to be in the future, rather than training according to how fit you are currently.

And that's not even considering that the vast majority of people who get on these Ironman/marathon training plans have some major training interruption along the way. Usually it's an injury, because they're on the plan and can't brook easing off training when the inevitable signs of overuse present themselves. "The plan said that I was going to gradually increase volume and intensity, so I ought to be able to run through these knee pains. I'm supposed to do 5 miles today."
 

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Never did an Iron, but have completed multiple marathons.

Seeming as your glaring need is in running. My suggestion to anyone that wants to be ready for the rigors of a marathon is working up to an average of 30-35 miles per week and holding that fitness for 4-6 months before embarking on a training program.

Coming from zero...the amount of time it might take you to get to avg. 30-35 miles per week -- SAFELY -- meaning you have allowed your bones/body time to adjust would be roughly another 5-6 months.

In the meantime...I would plan on doing a number of races over the course of the year. Running (5-10k--1/2 marathon) and some sprint/oly distance tris. Gauge yourself on these events to keep your training on track. Without knowing how you race...how do you know how hard to train? Once you run a race--you can start a progression based on any number of "pacing" scales you can find on the internet (McMillan for one) that will allow you to build safely using paces that have been set by your currently defined fitness.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
thatsmybush said:
Never did an Iron, but have completed multiple marathons.

Seeming as your glaring need is in running. My suggestion to anyone that wants to be ready for the rigors of a marathon is working up to an average of 30-35 miles per week and holding that fitness for 4-6 months before embarking on a training program.

Coming from zero...the amount of time it might take you to get to avg. 30-35 miles per week -- SAFELY -- meaning you have allowed your bones/body time to adjust would be roughly another 5-6 months.

In the meantime...I would plan on doing a number of races over the course of the year. Running (5-10k--1/2 marathon) and some sprint/oly distance tris. Gauge yourself on these events to keep your training on track. Without knowing how you race...how do you know how hard to train? Once you run a race--you can start a progression based on any number of "pacing" scales you can find on the internet (McMillan for one) that will allow you to build safely using paces that have been set by your currently defined fitness.
This makes sense to me. I'm going to have to find the motivation to run.
I like to bike. I enjoy swimming, but figure I'll need to get a little more planned training to up my swim time.
I honestly feel I could swim the 2.4 miles (albeit slow) and bike the 112 tomorrow, but there's no physical way I could finish the remainder.
I have a lot to learn.
 

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If you did a few half-iron events, then you should be pretty much set as far as training for the full IM. Same basic concepts, but longer distances, and your nutrition plan has to be rock solid.

If you've been on the bike, and you can still swim, then all you have to really focus on is the run. 1 year should be ample time.
 

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Baby steps. An important thing is to remain healthy with little to no injuries. You don't want to overtrain and end up injuring yourself so that you can not compete. Having said that, don't undertrain either:p

Good luck man! Joining a tri-club if there is one will be a great way to pick some peoples' minds too...:thumbsup:
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
oroy38 said:
and your nutrition plan has to be rock solid.
This is a kicker for me. I have a very hard time digesting anything solid when working out.
I don't know that gu gels/sports mix drinks are going to carry me thru without getting something a bit more substantial in me with this distance. I've got some books regarding nutrition that I'm apparently going to need to break open.

My wife is pretty exceptional. I don't disagree with the poster that stated she might be after life insurance. Either that or she'd rather me focus on training rather than trying to maul her all the time. Hey, whatever works!

Let the games begin: first run tomorrow.
 

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Good adivice from most here, so hopefully you have begun to develop a plan.

Me, I hope to be doing an Ironman in 2012, another in 2013, and 1 per year after that until I cannot do them anymore. Running and cycling are not my problems however, its the swimming. I am hiring a swimming coach specializing in open water swimming next spring to nail that part down. I am running 2 1/2 marathons and a full marathon this fall to build on my running. I will be riding 1 century or longer per month until February when I'll be riding the Sebring 12 hour ride, hopefully finishing with 200+ miles.

It's all about taking small steps, staying healthy and developing habits that will support an Ironman type of effort. Learning how to eat on the bike and run, how to bike after a 2.4 mile swim and run after a a 112 mile ride. The training is what matters in forging an Ironman: the race itself only confirms whether or not you have succeeded.
 
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