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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Ok, this may sound like a dumb question...

I'm working to shed a few pounds, and I know it's calories in/calories burned that matters...

What I'm wondering, is when you are at a defecit, or when you stabilize your calorie intake (to roughly in=burned) does the feeling of hunger persist? Or, is it just because I have just started this, and my body is not used to not getting fed whenever it wants?

I've set up my meals to be reasonably spaced, and I have snacks in between to keep the metabolism going, but does anyone have any tips on how to either curb the hunger pangs, or ways to bolster shear will power?

I know, lame, stupid questions... But I guess I am looking for real world day to day tips for coping with working at a calorie defecit that might help staying the course a little easier.

thanks in advance
gears
pmiska
 

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This is all stuff you've read or heard, but I think it works for me.
lots of water. lots of fiber (fruits and vegetables, whole grains). Don't skip the fat all together -- it lessens the sense of deprivation mentally, and it makes you feel more sated.
I used to hear that getting on the scale every day was not a good thing when you're trying to lose weight. I just read about a study that showed that it actually did help. I believe the latter.
 

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gastarbeiter
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also the standard line of making sure to eat protein, which keeps the hunger pang down for me.

whatever you do, don't do the 'heft on wheels' diet, and starve yourself to the point that you start digesting yourself.

i dropped 30 lbs over 6 months (180 to 150), but that was going from no excercise to getting back on the bike after a 9 year layoff, and only making minor adjustments to my diet (more veg, more protien, smaller portions of pasta, and cutting down on the beer ;)).


bill said:
This is all stuff you've read or heard, but I think it works for me.
lots of water. lots of fiber (fruits and vegetables, whole grains). Don't skip the fat all together -- it lessens the sense of deprivation mentally, and it makes you feel more sated.
I used to hear that getting on the scale every day was not a good thing when you're trying to lose weight. I just read about a study that showed that it actually did help. I believe the latter.
 

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LOOK lover
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616 Posts
I lost a lot of weight a couple years ago and have stayed at target since then. But dude, I am hungry all the time! The nature of the hunger, however, has changed. When I was first losing the weight, it was a gnawing, almost painful feeling in the pit of my stomach. Eventually, it became something that was tolerable. Now, I've learned the difference between being hungry and truly needing fuel. It's like I know based on how hungry I am whether I'm staying on target or going over/under.

Now, nothing works for everyone, but what worked for me was:
1) counting calories - lots of people don't need to do it, but for me it was essential.
2) daily weighing - I found it too easy to get off track if I only did it once a week.
3) eating throughout the day - dinner is often the only discrete meal I have, and portions are smallish. Otherwise I'm eating something on the hour.
4) bowl of cereal before bedtime - I know a lot of people say don't eat at night, but for me it really took the edge off, and the calories were accounted for in the total plan.
5) all the nutritional things everybody already knows - fruits, whole grains, cereals, lean meats, low-fat, blah blah
6) low-fat popcorn - filling for those evening snack attacks, and powdered seasoning made it taste like much more than the 100 calories it really was.
7) Candy! Yes, it's true that a single Reese's peanut butter cup contains a whopping 115 calories and 6.5 g of fat, but getting to have one after dinner each night satisfied the urge and I was good to go.

p.s. I'm still hungry!
 
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