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This is basic physics.... like.... elementary school level!!
pssstttt.... that's how a microwave oven works

he dares to put down his explanation. Is that ur final answer tig?

of course he left it extremely vague.

for starters, before I even open the wide web, any idea what frequency microwaves are? They aren’t coming off ur bike.
 

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he dares to put down his explanation. Is that ur final answer tig?

of course he left it extremely vague.

for starters, before I even open the wide web, any idea what frequency microwaves are? They aren’t coming off ur bike.
Further information: Dielectric heating

Consumer ovens work around a nominal 2.45 gigahertz (GHz)—a wavelength of 12.2 centimetres (4.80 in) in the 2.4 GHz to 2.5 GHz ISM band—while large industrial/commercial ovens often use 915 megahertz (MHz)—32.8 centimetres (12.9 in).[27] Water, fat, and other substances in the food absorb energy from the microwaves in a process called dielectric heating. Many molecules (such as those of water) are electric dipoles, meaning that they have a partial positive charge at one end and a partial negative charge at the other, and therefore rotate as they try to align themselves with the alternating electric field of the microwaves. Rotating molecules hit other molecules and put them into motion, thus dispersing energy.

This energy, dispersed as molecular rotations, vibrations and/or translations in solids and liquids, raises the temperature of the food, in a process similar to heat transfer by contact with a hotter body.[28] It is a common misconception that microwave ovens heat food by operating at a special resonance of water molecules in the food. As noted microwave ovens can operate at many frequencies.

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David E. Hintenlang, associate professor nuclear and radiological engineering at the University of Florida at Gainesville, adds some further details:

"Microwave ovens cook food by generating intermolecular friction between the molecules of the food. The microwaves cause water molecules to vibrate; the increased friction between the molecules results in heat.

# Amazon.com : physics for dummies
 

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you found any microwaves or other high frequency waves coming off your bike?

you should read the links i post:

Dielectric heating, also known as electronic heating, radio frequency heating, and high-frequency heating, is the process in which a radio frequency (RF) alternating electric field, or radio wave or microwave electromagnetic radiation heats a dielectric material. At higher frequencies, this heating is caused by molecular dipole rotation within the dielectric.
 

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They're with your strawman made from concrete shaking on the table
"Definition of straw man

1: a weak or imaginary opposition (such as an argument or adversary) set up only to be easily confuted"


waiting for you to explain to me how microwaves or something are heating my insides from a rough road. are you going to as it looks like youre avoiding that and moved into the non-sensical? I assume the latter but lets see. you said it was simple. you said it was elementary school stuff. can you?
 

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can you post anything showing vibrations as would be caused by a bike causing heat in a human? its elementary school stuff you say. you told me three times that's how it works but no explanation and told me to read a physics book. you have a book in mind that would explain what you know or cant you explain? its not in the last book you posted.


so like a microwave you say...but just without any high frequency electromagnetic waves getting into molecules causing friction. then how is it heating? friction of what?


you have access to the whole web. show me youre capable of backing up something youre so adamantly sure of, or dont and realize you have nothing and are full of it. dont just say it...show it.
 

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can you post anything showing vibrations as would be caused by a bike causing heat in a human? its elementary school stuff you say. you told me three times that's how it works but no explanation and told me to read a physics book. you have a book in mind that would explain what you know or cant you explain? its not in the last book you posted.
Hard to believe this is a serious request. Are you seriously suggesting that you need proof that mechanical energy (shaking of the human body) is translated into heat? How else could the energy be absorbed by the body? This is physics 101. Or maybe 7th grade science.
 

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Yea I find it hard to believe hundreds of watts of energy that were going toward a bicycle’s momentum are simply turned to heat in the body. I’ve looked and there’s lots of studies related to vibrations and consequences to the human body. No better evidence than just saying it?
 

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Yea I find it hard to believe hundreds of watts of energy that were going toward a bicycle’s momentum are simply turned to heat in the body.
Where did you make this up from?
Momentum is lost through mostly wind resistance. And tire resistance.


Hard to believe this is a serious request. Are you seriously suggesting that you need proof that mechanical energy (shaking of the human body) is translated into heat? How else could the energy be absorbed by the body? This is physics 101. Or maybe 7th grade science.
Maybe it converts the energy to light. But I don't know anyone who glows when they ride a bike.
Or maybe it converts the energy to fat. But I don't know anyone who gains several pounds when they ride a bike.
 

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Yea I find it hard to believe hundreds of watts of energy that were going toward a bicycle’s momentum are simply turned to heat in the body. I’ve looked and there’s lots of studies related to vibrations and consequences to the human body. No better evidence than just saying it?
Are you an engineer or a mad scientist?
 

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Where did you make this up from?
Momentum is lost through mostly wind resistance. And tire resistance.
Did u read the links? Read the definition for suspension/impedance losses. It is explained as a loss of the bicycle momentum as heat through vibration of body tissue. I thought we were past this part. It states this can be many times greater than rolling resistance in the tire.

if a body riding a bike has no possible friction, such as a block of concrete, there would be no friction in that body. I imagine a bike with a block of concrete rolling down a rough course will not get as far as a blob of water/fat/bones.
 

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Did u read the links? Read the definition for suspension/impedance losses. It is explained as a loss of the bicycle momentum as heat through vibration of body tissue. I thought we were past this part. It states this can be many times greater than rolling resistance in the tire
No clue what you're rambling about. "Hundreds of watts" of momentum would equate to 20+ mph. Wind is the overwhelming resistance slowing you down. This is just simple physics.
There are not "hundreds of watts" of energy taken from a bicycle’s momentum and turned to heat. That's ridiculous.

 

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I’m talking about suspension or impedance losses. If u bother to read what the links say and what I’m saying you’d find you’re actually agreeing with me in that the body converting possibly hundreds of watts in momentum to heat seems unrealistic. That’s what they say. That’s the definition of suspension or impedance losses




but there’s room for variables as written below (gotten from discussion at bottom of the link just above): Micro jumps.




“However, I am not sure that this suspension losses are caused by vibrations in the body tissues. They could be trivially caused by micro-jumps due to road irregularities. In a jump, part of the energy is probably lost in the landing and not converted in forward motion. Even Josh Poertner seems to suggest a similar explanation.
However, apart from my hypothetical explanations, to establish if the losses are due to body tissue vibrations or micro-jumps, would be hard to do. Probably one should use a trike (able to travel for short distances with no one on board) with ballast and on a slope, and see if the results are the same, that is lower pressure leading to faster speeds. If the results are confirmed also for an unammend trike, then the reason for suspension losses is not body tissue vibrations but micro jumps.”

(the solid ballast (concrete) vs water/fat/bone roll test I also proposed).

the energy of course has to go somewhere. Bike suspension forks heat up but is it the spring itself’s internal friction, which would be analogous to our body on the bike, or is it friction of the other fork parts.
 
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