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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Hi, I apologize. But this dumb newbie is confused. Will any road shoe work with my
clip/stap stock pedals? It became very obvious the few times I did ride last year that I
was losing a large amount of power with soft soled shoes.
So, can I use the shoes for now and get the clipless pedals in the future? Or am I better
off going clipless at the same time.
Thanks for any help you can provide. :)
 

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XSarge said:
Hi, I apologize. But this dumb newbie is confused. Will any road shoe work with my
clip/stap stock pedals? It became very obvious the few times I did ride last year that I
was losing a large amount of power with soft soled shoes.
So, can I use the shoes for now and get the clipless pedals in the future? Or am I better
off going clipless at the same time.
Thanks for any help you can provide. :)
You'll have to go clipless if you buy road shoes, they are made for clipless pedals.
 

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"Any road shoe" . . . I'm gonna be clueless here and ASSUME when you mean "road shoe" it's a "road shoe" or cycling, and not a "road shoe" for jogging/running.

But since I bring this up -- You mention "losing power to soft sole shoes" and that suggest maybe you're using a jogging/running/recreational shoe and not a cycling shoe.

Cycling shoes I've looked at recently are "multi-task" intended for riding and walking around a bit, through the aisles of the grocery, maybe parking the bike and walking down to the beach, etc. Such shoe designs are OK for MTB and recreational cycling, but they're not efficient for serious road riding. They're too heavy, generally not stiff enough.

Road bike shoes, for "racing" are stiff sole, light, rigid, and nearly impossible to walk on. I have a pair with cleats for straps/clips. I take them off and go barefoot if I'm hanging around the shop. Otherwise, the hard soles skid and slide on commercial floor surfaces. I've carried flop-flop thongs in my jersey for going into stores or getting down on the beach. Theyr'e single pupose, not "multi-taskers" -- for riding, not walking.

I've been riding/racing since about 1962. I don't currently race. I DON'T RACE. I use a road shoe intended for riding, NOT "multi-purpose" or "untility recreation." They're impossible to walk in, but reasonably efficient for riding. They don't allow lateral motion of the foot on the pedal, but the genes gave me aligned knees so that's not an issue.

I looked at clipless, budgeted about $300 for shoes/pedals. You need shoes to match the pedals. Locally, in this one shop small town where riders don't race, it's hard to find a decent road shoe. Most shoes in stock are MTB and "recreation/utility" bike shoes, with heavy soles designed for walking.

I ordered some Nike shoes and when they arrived they didn't fit. It's impossible to get a good fit in a shoe through mail order, online, etc. You need to sit in the shop and try them on until you get the ideal fit. If the fit is not ideal, you'll be unhappy down the road.

Three points of contact on the bike: Saddle, pedals, bars. Each point needs to be optimal for any serious riding. We've discussed in here having a separate forum section just for saddle/shorts/chamois discussion. Shoes and pedals are nearly as crucial, maybe only slightly less complicated.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 · (Edited)
Yes, I tried my running shoes with bad results. So, are you saying that cycling shoes are either made for clips OR clipless but not both??? And thanks for the saddle, pedals, bars advice. I have wide shoulders and I'm already considering wider bars.
I like the flip flop idea. Maybe I'll try it if I don't get walkable shoes.
I purchased a LeMond Big Sky S last year to help me get healthier. I'm very motivated but have a LOAD of weight to lose. How involved I get into cycling from here is yet to be seen. I've lost nearly 20lbs. since Nov. just by eating healthier. And I'll need all the help I can get from you more knowledgable riders. Thanks for sharing your knowledge up to this point.
Any suggestions on which shoes to look at for my current set-up? I'd like to stay under $150 if possible.
 

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I'd check your local bike shops and see if they have Shimano shoes that are low-end MTB or "touring" shoes. Typically these will have somewhat stiffer soles so you get good power transfer and they will also have a cut-out piece that you can remove later should you desire to go clipless. They will be easy to walk around in also.

Now, another option is to try on the Shimano, get an idea what your size is, then go to Nashbar or Performance and look for a shoe/pedal combo. These are descent, low end, but great for a beginner-intermediate rider. Unless you put a boatload of miles on, or intend on racing, it really doesn't make sense to go with the "name" stuff.
 

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Discussion Starter · #6 ·
Thanks KonaMan. I'll start shopping this week for what fits best and compare prices on line. I'm lucky to be in an area with several shops. I'm kind of in a hurry in case we get some more decent weather. So we'll see what I find.
You also answered one of my main concerns about converting the shoes later. Thanks again. :D
 

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Cycling shoes are designed to be used in conjunction with a cleat and pedal.

That said, you could buy a cycling shoe and never install the cleat and used them on your flats (assumption you are using flats) with or without a toe clip.

The stiff sole will give some power transfer advantages that you might notice (might not). What they will likely help most with is any foot pain or cramping that you might experience in a ride of 50+ miles.

Good luck, ask more questions
Scot
 
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