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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I like the idea of a winged drop bar for my in-progress build.
But I have no experience with them...are these comfortable or is the wing a gimmick?
It's not a racing build...just recreational firetrail stuff.
Does the 'wing' get in the way of mounting 31.8 cross levers on this bar?
Thanks.
 

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I'll give you my off the cuff bike snob opinion and then a bit of analysis.

It looks really fred and is designed to solve a nonexistant problem IMO. If you are spending so much time on the tops that you find them uncomfortable, then your TT is probably too long or your bars are too low (i.e. use your hoods and your drops more). The argument that they are more aerodynamic is bogus as well (such a small difference, especially if you tape the tops). I imagine it would make cross levers less effective because it would be harder to get a solid grip on the bar with you pinky and ring fingers while braking.
 

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I have to disagree with the previous poster, winged bars are great if you have experience numbness. I love climbing with them as well. BUT this is for the roadbike. So for the OP, try 'em, you may like them.

Now for CX, no need cause if you are on the tops, you aren't going that fast.....might as well be comfy.
 

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Had them on my road and CX bikes last year. If you're building it up new, it's worth conssidering (i.e. don't switch out an old one if you have a bar already). They are more comfortable if you ride a lot on the tops. As the other posters have mentioned, they don't add anything performance-wise. If you're racing, stick with the traditional bars, as you get a more solid grip on them when you're really hammering.
 

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Here's another vote for winged bars but with a caveat. I tried the winged version of the EA70 and liked it. However, the angle of the flats was a bit off for me. I currently have regular round bars on all of my bikes but if I suffered from hand numbness, I wouldn't hesitate to give winged bars a try.

Bar comfort is probably somewhat like saddle comfort -- to each his own. We all have a different anatomy.
 

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I agree with the kid as well, for the purpose of CX racing.

The only place that wing bars are actually useful is on sustained climbs where you spend most of your time on the tops, and by sustained I mean 30+ minutes of steady uphill. So for scottd these may actually be useful since he is not racing CX.

If you are experiencing hand numbness you need to get rid of the problem not the symptom. The problem is that your bike is fitted incorrectly and needs to be set-up so that you are comfortable in the drops and hoods.
 

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Another vote for winged bars

With a caveat. I run FSA Compact bars on all my bikes because I like the shape and dimensions of the reach and drop. If a round topped bar had those, I would consider it. That said, I have large hands and the winged section of those bars fits pretty well.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Thanks from scottd

I appreciate all the opinions
I'm new to this forum and I find it fascinating

As far as the winged bars:
1 I'm not racing
2 Most of my riding is road and most of that is climbing
3 the cross aspects for me are fire-trail recreational (with an extra set of wheels/tires)
4 this is a new build...only own about 1/3rd the stuff so far

I'll likley post more questions as I develop my build
Thanks again
 

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I actually like the idea of ovalized tops on road bars. For rough roads/trails, it helps to distribute the shock over a greater surface area (like Ergon mountain bike grips, which I also really like). I have the FSA Wing Pro Alloy, which may be a bit too wingy and I feel like I lose some grip. I actually prefer the shape on my FSA Compact Wing Alloy (or whatever they're called)--the top section is not as wide and feels nice. For normal road riding, most people don't really need to hold the bartops tightly, so the deeper wing isn't a bad thing, but for cyclocross or rough road riding, it's nice to be able to get a solid grip on the bartops.
 

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Depends on the angle of the wing. I had a set of EC-70 wings that I bought and hated on my roadie because the angle of the wing when I had the bars in the race position was more of a carpal tunel problem than anything else. Roadie had Campy Record and seat high/head tube low geometry.

So I went to the RavX after really spending a lot of time at the LBS holding bars (they did think I was nuts after a while). Its doing the job.

Then I bought the girlfirend's Cyclocross Specialized Tricross Sport for an office bike and put the EC-70's on it. I guess the geometry of the Trisport is different enough from the LeMond Versailles Campy that the EC-70 with Sora shifters really feels OK on the commute.

So, its not just the bars and the design but how they fit on the geometry of the bike. Best advice, take the bike to the store and see if they will put it on a trainer and mount the bars for you to try out on a rainy day.

Also, take a look at the ergo EC-90's. Not wing, but the shape of the bar looks interesting and I've heard good things about them.

Also, word to the wise, carbon bars might not be good for DH biking. Cyclocross, I would think OK. I'm confident in all carbon products if they are brand name.
 

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EricofAZ said:
Also, word to the wise, carbon bars might not be good for DH biking. Cyclocross, I would think OK. I'm confident in all carbon products if they are brand name.
I would say the consensus on carbon bars isn't that they're fragile, but that they represent a very poor return for your investment. They weigh ~30-40g less than a top flite aluminum bar like Ritchey WCS and they cost 4x as much. With the difference in price between my aluminum bars and those EC90s I can buy a sweet pair of tubular tires. Some people worry they will break more frequently or in a more dangerous way than aluminum bars but the weight/$ spent line of argument is more than enough for me.

With specific reference to this thread a carbon wing bar would be fine (but expensive) for the type of use described by the OP and if they leave the tops untaped it would look marginally less dorky than an aluminum wing bar. Of course everyone is entitled to their own opinion on what looks dorky.
 

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co2cycle said:
I actually like the idea of ovalized tops on road bars. For rough roads/trails, it helps to distribute the shock over a greater surface area (like Ergon mountain bike grips, which I also really like). I have the FSA Wing Pro Alloy, which may be a bit too wingy and I feel like I lose some grip. I actually prefer the shape on my FSA Compact Wing Alloy (or whatever they're called)--the top section is not as wide and feels nice. For normal road riding, most people don't really need to hold the bartops tightly, so the deeper wing isn't a bad thing, but for cyclocross or rough road riding, it's nice to be able to get a solid grip on the bartops.
The thing about an Ergon grip is that they are narrow where the thumb and index finger wrap around the bar so you can get a solid grip. I haven't seen any wing bars that look like that (and frankly it would look horrible, so its probably for the best). This is why I think any wide wing (i.e. anything carbon with a wing shape) would be useless except for seated climbing and relaxed cruising on smooth roads.
 

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What I found is that the aluminum bars (Richie Pro) were too hard on my hands and wrists for commuting. The bike is pretty stiff, especially with smaller tires. So the carbon absorbed a lot of the road stuff and and for me, that was worth it. But certainly there are a lot of things to consider when making these kinds of decisions.
 

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from personal experience, I didn't like have a winged bar for cross, switched it out last year for a regular old round bar, but I there are others who I have seen use them for a couple of years now

my biggest complaint was like other posters have said, the angle was funny when I set them up the way I like them
 
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