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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I need a workstand. Any reason not to go with the Spin Doctor Pro G3 that's got a very nice discount now on a certain popular online store? (not sure if I should post link or not) I will be using it to work on both my road and mountain bikes. I can also see it be used to store a bike between rides since my garage is a bit of a mess right now lol
 

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I've been using the Pro G3 for several years now. I like it. Maybe a bit larger then some but it's served me well.

I don't know what crit_boy's comment means. I clamp my bikes wherever I like, on the top tube or the seat post. I use a cloth between the jaws and the bike to prevent scratching.

That being said, I bought a Park PCS-10 stand for my son-in-law last Christmas. I thought it looked nice, (especially the clamp) but have not used it myself. It's quite a bit more compact.
 

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While I love my Feedback Sports work stand, there's nothing wrong with the Spin Doctor Pro G3. And, I'm with J.R. - I have no clue what "there is a reason no to go with the performance stand - it clamps the seat post" means. A) Clamping the seat post is preferred and B) That stand will clamp the seat post, seat tube, top tube... it rotates.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I wound up with the Park PCS-10. I decided their quick clamp was worth the extra cash. All of the Feedback stands were sold out except the Pro Elite model that was $100 more than the Park.
 

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I have no clue what "there is a reason no to go with the performance stand - it clamps the seat post" means. A) Clamping the seat post is preferred and B) That stand will clamp the seat post, seat tube, top tube... it rotates.
if the design is to clamp the seat post and it's Carbon Fiber - bad idea - same for top tube.
 

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if the design is to clamp the seat post and it's Carbon Fiber - bad idea - same for top tube.
No... clamping a carbon tube - seat post or frame - with a ton of force is a bad idea. Clamping a carbon tube with enough force to hold the bike is absolutely fine.
 

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Yes, there is a reason no to go with the performance stand - it clamps the seat post.

Get a Feedback sprint stand.
^This^ Easily my favorite stand. Works with almost any front end that exists at this point. Stable. Light. Red.
 

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There are advantages to the clamp style stands and the fork block style. I luckily have both and use the one that best fits what I am doing - - an old Wrenchforce with the "screw" clamp and the Feedback Sports Sprint.

If you have a carbon seatpost or frame, the fork mount stands are nice and fairly quick to get the bike on and get started once you get the front wheel off. If you have an alloy post, the clamp style is probably the quickest to get the bike on and get started. If you have a carbon seat post, the easiest is to get a cheap alloy post and put it in when you need to work on your bike - just mark your carbon post height with tape before removing.

I find that if I need to get over the bars or rear end of the bike, the clamp style is better because I can rotate the bike down to get the angle I need to work. It's something you cannot easily do on with the fork mount stands. Also if I need to work on the underside of the bb shell for some reason the same applies, clamp style all the way. The underside of the bb shell is in accessible on the fork stand. Another downside is if you have a stubborn bolt somewhere towards the back of the bike, the bike can move around on the rubber foot / block that the bb shell rests on while you are attempting to work so it can at times feel not as secure.

The fork stand shines for most else however. Can easily rotate left/right, adjust height up to bring bottom bracket or pedals or rear gearing up so you don't have to bend down.

I primarily use my Feedback Sports Sprint stand proabaly 90% of the time now.
 

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I clamp my bikes wherever I like, on the top tube or the seat post. I use a cloth between the jaws and the bike to prevent scratching.
Very, very bad idea to clamp on the top tube regardless of what the bike is made out of. If using clamp stand, use the seat post for two reasons:

1) In most cases, the seat post is thicker than the bike frame tubing.

2) It is a lot cheaper and easier to replace your seat post than your bike frame if you destroy it.

Never clamp carbon, period. As Tinball said, if you have a carbon seat post, buy a cheap aluminum seat post and swap it out when you put the bike on the stand.
 

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I have been clamping carbon seat tubes and seat posts (seat post is absolutely the better of the two) for years - with no issues. I like the slide and screw type clamp - you can limit/adjust the clamp force.

And yeah - I agree, clamping a top tube is a bad idea.
 

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I have been clamping carbon seat tubes and seat posts (seat post is absolutely the better of the two) for years - with no issues. I like the slide and screw type clamp - you can limit/adjust the clamp force.

And yeah - I agree, clamping a top tube is a bad idea.
Same here. My Park stand has rubber padding in the jaws. If it's really an issue, you can always swap out a cheap metal seat post, but it isn't an issue. I'd never clamp any frame tube.
 

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Never clamp carbon, period. As Tinball said, if you have a carbon seat post, buy a cheap aluminum seat post and swap it out when you put the bike on the stand.
WTF. If carbon seatposts can't be clamped how to heck do people hold them up in the frame? Answer: with a heck of a lot more concentrated clamping force than a workstand will put on it.
 

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WTF. If carbon seatposts can't be clamped how to heck do people hold them up in the frame? Answer: with a heck of a lot more concentrated clamping force than a workstand will put on it.
Yes, thank you. I was waiting for this practical and common sense reply much sooner.

I can't believe how people miss the most obvious contradiction in their thinking when they are scared to clamp a carbon post.

Yes, you need to be more careful with non-round posts. But you can still hold them with the appropriate clamp shape from the front and back (no the sides).
 

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Yes, you need to be more careful with non-round posts. But you can still hold them with the appropriate clamp shape from the front and back (no the sides).
Much like most consumer level clamp style stands, the stand in the OP clamps from the sides.

OP asked for a reason not to buy that stand. OP has been provided a reason.

You may find that risking damage to your stuff is an acceptable risk, I choose not to take the risk. As for top tube and seat tube clampers, I have no desire to risk scratching paint or damaging carbon.

For me, the risks of clamp type stands outweigh inconvenience of removing the front wheel.
 

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WTF. If carbon seatposts can't be clamped how to heck do people hold them up in the frame? Answer: with a heck of a lot more concentrated clamping force than a workstand will put on it.
And the torque spec for the not completely round, not surrounding your entire post save a small sliver clamping device on the bike stand per the frame manufacturer is??????
 

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And the torque spec for the not completely round, not surrounding your entire post save a small sliver clamping device on the bike stand per the frame manufacturer is??????
This was going to be my next point. Jay, do you use a torque wrench when clamping the jaws of your stand around your carbon seat post? :confused: I guess if you are a very experienced wrench, you can feel what is enough and what is too much. For the rest of us, it's not worth taking the risk.
 

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This was going to be my next point. Jay, do you use a torque wrench when clamping the jaws of your stand around your carbon seat post? :confused: I guess if you are a very experienced wrench, you can feel what is enough and what is too much. For the rest of us, it's not worth taking the risk.
If you think the force required to hold a 15-20 pound bike is anywhere remotely near what it takes to hold under 120-300 pounds (a rider) using a much larger and spread out surface area I suppose you might need a torque measurement on your workstand. More that three brain cells should mitigate that need though.
 
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