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noob roadie :)
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Discussion Starter #1
I went to see a bike last week, and I didn't buy it in the end. The frame was raced for one full season in Ontario Cup, and it is made using carbon lugs. In front of the seatpost, where the carbon tube is glued onto the carbon lug, there is a very clear white line across the top half of the tube. To me, I think this stress mark was caused by having the seat post too high. The shop is willing to give me a 5 year warranty on the frame.

The components seem to be in pretty good shape, and it is a good deal assuming the frame checks out. So would you guys go for it or not??

Thanks,

Ming
 

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macming said:
In front of the seatpost, where the carbon tube is glued onto the carbon lug, there is a very clear white line across the top half of the tube.
Just think what a great deal it will be when the frame dumps your butt on the road at 20 mph. It likely would be fine, but who cares? There has to be a better deal out there.
 

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n00bsauce
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Ming, what happened to the Cannondale deal?
 

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noob roadie :)
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Discussion Starter #4
Mel Erickson said:
Ming, what happened to the Cannondale deal?
Too many choices :D Still got my money down on the Cannondale, but when I'm studying, I tend to distract myself and think about bikes.

I guess this thread is for closure, because I really liked the Aquila for its components and price, but I just wanted to make sure I made the right decision walking out of the deal.

The Cannondale is a nice bike, but I will end up spending more money in the end by changing a few components. But it will be brand new, and probably last me quite a bit longer.

I'm going to test ride the R5000 and Six 13 on Tuesday to see which frame I like better :D

Ming
 

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my guess is that the racer was a weight weenie who cut an aluminum post too short. The white line sounds like crazing(microcracking) in the epoxy. It's hard to say alot without seeeing the bike. But without seeing it, my guess is that it will probably not cause you problems as long as you use a longer seatpost. If you're getting the bike for 25% of list bc of this, it could be a good deal. One way to test the seatpost area is pseudo tighten down the seatpost bolt and take a post and put it in there. If, when you get to the white line, it stops or gets significantly tighter, then I would not purchase it.

Crazing: The development of a multitude of very fine cracks in the matrix material, resulting from stresses which exceed the tensile strength of me plastic. Such stresses may result from shrinkage or machining, flexing, impact shocks, temperature changes, or the action of solvents.
 

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noob roadie :)
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Discussion Starter #6
Friction_Shifter said:
my guess is that the racer was a weight weenie who cut an aluminum post too short. The white line sounds like crazing(microcracking) in the epoxy. It's hard to say alot without seeeing the bike. But without seeing it, my guess is that it will probably not cause you problems as long as you use a longer seatpost. If you're getting the bike for 25% of list bc of this, it could be a good deal. One way to test the seatpost area is pseudo tighten down the seatpost bolt and take a post and put it in there. If, when you get to the white line, it stops or gets significantly tighter, then I would not purchase it.

Crazing: The development of a multitude of very fine cracks in the matrix material, resulting from stresses which exceed the tensile strength of me plastic. Such stresses may result from shrinkage or machining, flexing, impact shocks, temperature changes, or the action of solvents.
Your analysis was correct. The bike was using a carbon post, but it was about 20-30mm above the minimum insertion length.

Due to the possible safety harzard with using such a frame, and the components did have one season of training/racing on them, I think I will skip on the bike for now. Also, the bike was going for about 1/2 of the MRSP $2400 instead of the $4900, so it really isn't that great of a deal. I can get a Cannondale R5000 for $2675, or a Six 13 R3000 for $3100, both brand new. I think the brand new route will be safer, and probably save me more money down the road.

Ming
 

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Not that I'm smart or sane, but

I got a used Look with a hairline crack on the top of the seat tube that made tightening the seat post impossible. I used epoxy to secure the post in the tube and have been riding it that way for 3 years. If I get shorter or taller, I could be in a bit of a fix, but that seems unlikely at my age.
 

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noob roadie :)
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Discussion Starter #8
rusa1586 said:
I got a used Look with a hairline crack on the top of the seat tube that made tightening the seat post impossible. I used epoxy to secure the post in the tube and have been riding it that way for 3 years. If I get shorter or taller, I could be in a bit of a fix, but that seems unlikely at my age.
I agree this approach maybe good if the price is right. However, the seller still wants 1/2 of the MRSP for a bike that has been raced/trained on for an entire Ontario Cup season. With a frame defect like that, I really don't thikn it's all that great of a deal.

I went to my LBS today and test rode a Cannndale R5000 and a 2005 Ultegra Six 13. I'm going with the Six 13, and it is only costing me an extra grand for the bike, brand new. :)

Thanks for the feedback...

Ming
 

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macming said:
I agree this approach maybe good if the price is right. However, the seller still wants 1/2 of the MRSP for a bike that has been raced/trained on for an entire Ontario Cup season. With a frame defect like that, I really don't thikn it's all that great of a deal.

Me either! The bike I got cost $262.50 for a bike with some Chorus parts on it.

Just relating an anecdote about a similar situation.
 
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