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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I've had my racing bike for about 4 yrs now and average about 3K miles per season - mix of racing and training. Is it worth it for me to spring for one of those "full" tuneups offered by my LBS? I'm talking about the one where they unpack the bearings, strip everything down and lube each square inch.

I keep my bike reasonably clean - it gets a bath frequently, drive train is spotless and wheels tru.

I have a sneaking feeling it is all a big scam but then I think that about anything that costs over $100 ... Thoughts?

Thanks,

Krishna
 

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So???

krishna said:
I've had my racing bike for about 4 yrs now and average about 3K miles per season - mix of racing and training. Is it worth it for me to spring for one of those "full" tuneups offered by my LBS? I'm talking about the one where they unpack the bearings, strip everything down and lube each square inch.

I keep my bike reasonably clean - it gets a bath frequently, drive train is spotless and wheels tru.

I have a sneaking feeling it is all a big scam but then I think that about anything that costs over $100 ... Thoughts?

Thanks,

Krishna
So you haven't had your bike worked on in over 4 years?? Hmm, I don't care how clean you keep it, it is well past time for a tune up. Personally, when I ride a lot, mine gets worked every couple of weeks just to keep things neat and trim and running tight. So I'm not sure how you've gone for 4 years. Yes, do it, and expect to actually pay more, because there is going to be some stuff that needs to get replaced, no doubt about it.
 

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a complete overhaul from a good mechanic will feel like a new bike. all new bearings, new handlebar wrap, new cables and housing, everything removed and cleaned. there is nothing like it. expect to be without your bike for a few days, but its worth it. before you do it though have your mechanic check your drivetrain to make sure nothing else (chain, cassette) needs replacing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Clarification

magnolialover said:
So you haven't had your bike worked on in over 4 years??
I don't mean I've never taken it to the shop, its just that those visits were for very specific reasons. Never turned it over for the rather vague sounding "tuneup".
 

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krishna said:
I don't mean I've never taken it to the shop, its just that those visits were for very specific reasons. Never turned it over for the rather vague sounding "tuneup".
A complete overhaul, including new cables and housing, will run you anywhere from $100 to $200, depending on how mucked up the bike happens to be. Figure the high-end of that scale if you want everything pulled apart and re-packed.
 

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Maybe especially so...

krishna said:
I keep my bike reasonably clean - it gets a bath frequently, drive train is spotless and wheels tru.
If you've kept the drivetrain that clean, there's a fair chance that you've washed out a fair bit of bearing grease along the way. You might be about due.

What I'd personally recommend is spending the cash on a few proper tools and a maintenance book. For not much more than the cost of one tune-up, and certainly less than two, you can get the stuff needed for a lifetime of tune-ups, and gain a valuable skill and understanding about your bike. OTOH, if you're not mechanically inclined and don't like the thought of risking creating an even more expensive repair, there's nothing wrong with letting the shop have at it.
 

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DIY for all

My philosphy is to tear the bike down to the bare frame once per year, plus the weekly chain clean & lube. This task used to be considered part of being a cyclist, but so many people now just upgrade and replace rather than maintain, obviously driven by Shimano design choices (no user serviceable parts inside). If your bike has 12K miles on it, it is long overdue for a complete overhaul. Either that, or just upgrade everything and throw that "old stuff" in the trash.
 

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Campy goodness!

Okay, okay, so I couldn't do it myself.

But a $250 set of Chorus ergopowers that looked beat-up on the outside and didn't work were fixed by my LBS guy for $50 (new hoods, new ... some kind of internal component) after a crash.

Yep.
 

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2nd that...

danl1 said:
If you've kept the drivetrain that clean, there's a fair chance that you've washed out a fair bit of bearing grease along the way. You might be about due.

What I'd personally recommend is spending the cash on a few proper tools and a maintenance book. For not much more than the cost of one tune-up, and certainly less than two, you can get the stuff needed for a lifetime of tune-ups, and gain a valuable skill and understanding about your bike. OTOH, if you're not mechanically inclined and don't like the thought of risking creating an even more expensive repair, there's nothing wrong with letting the shop have at it.
Get the tools and a book and go at it. It's not as intimidating as it may seem, and there's really not much to it. With the exception of truing wheels - which is IMO a skill that takes time & experience, you'd be surprised how easy, fun & rewarding working on your bike is.
 

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If you can't do the overhaul yourself, I'd suggest you get it done right away. If you've never had it done, get ready to replace some $$ parts, unless you're extremely lucky.
 

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krishna said:
I've had my racing bike for about 4 yrs now and average about 3K miles per season - mix of racing and training. Is it worth it for me to spring for one of those "full" tuneups offered by my LBS? I'm talking about the one where they unpack the bearings, strip everything down and lube each square inch.

I keep my bike reasonably clean - it gets a bath frequently, drive train is spotless and wheels tru.

I have a sneaking feeling it is all a big scam but then I think that about anything that costs over $100 ... Thoughts?

Thanks,

Krishna
The bike is due for an overhaul. Considering how long you've had the bike, a $100 for an overhaul is a good deal. Ask the shop exactly what is included with the overhaul. Are cables, housing, bartape, brake pads, or any other parts included?
The hubs, bottom bracket, and headset should at least be disassembed and checked for wear and then regreased and reassembed. This takes up the majority of the labor time in an overhaul job. Whether you do it yourself or have the shop do it depends on what you know about mechanics, how much you care to learn about bike mechanics, and how much money you want to spend.
If you have no tools and just need to get the job done, give the shop your business.
If you want to a more satisifying learning experience, spend the $100, and a couple hundred more on the necessary tools and parts, and add http://www.parktool.com/repair/ to your bookmarks. Then you'll be able to do a yearly overhaul yourself.
 

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The bike has 12,000 miles.
How many times have you replaced the chain?
How many times have you replaced the cassette?
Cables and housing?
Have you ever had the hubs overhauled?
Replaced the brake pads?

If you've done none of this, you're in for an expensive and much needed overhaul.
 

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The bike has 12,000 miles.
How many times have you replaced the chain?
How many times have you replaced the cassette?
Cables and housing?
Have you ever had the hubs overhauled?
Replaced the brake pads?

If you've done none of this, you're in for an expensive and much needed overhaul.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
OK - taking her in tonight

Decided to listen to the wisdom of the board and take her in for the grand tuneup. LBS says $100 for everything. I'll post the final cost.

Someone asked if I had ever changed the chain/cassette. Changed the chain once, cassette never. BUT, I am spreading the wear over two cassettes since I have training wheels & racing wheels. Plus I use Campy components which wear much less (or so I'm told)

- K
 
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