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Discussion Starter · #1 · (Edited)
So last month, I'm standing in line at my LBS waiting to pay for my new lock, when I hear this obese looking guy ask for help on the floor in finding a really light carbon framed road bike. The salesman asks this guy if this bike was for him or someone else. The fat guy then gives him this disgusting look of insult, and responds by answering, "It's for me, of course!". The salesman shows this guy several bikes in his size and the fat guy insists upon buying the lightest carbon fiber bike that Trek makes, despite the cost. I mean this guy is looking at $4K and $6K bikes, all the while asking about which bike is likely to be the lightest and fastest. The salesman never bothers to explain to this guy that speed is primarily dependent upon the overall strength and weight of the rider.

The salesman has a slight smirk on his face as all the witnesses can easily tell what he's thinking...People who are quite a bit more than slightly obese, need not be concerned about the weight of any kind of upscaled, high end, carbon fiber racing bike, if they themselves by far outweigh any of their competitors.

Finally, I get to the cashier and pay for my lock. Afterwards, I walk out of this bike shop just shaking my head at all the insanity.

You just can't fix stupid!
 

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What the what???
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Did you consider that maybe this "stupid" guy doesn't plan on being overweight forever? Maybe this "stupid" guy recently lost 50 pounds and this bike is his reward to himself and motivation to get in better shape.

Nah, nevermind. Myopia and snap judgments are easier.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 · (Edited)
Did you consider that maybe this "stupid" guy doesn't plan on being overweight forever? Maybe this "stupid" guy recently lost 50 pounds and this bike is his reward to himself and motivation to get in better shape.
I would think that the last thing you'd want to do, would be to ride a CF road racing bike that has a weight limit far below your current weight, not knowing for certain if you'd be capable of losing anymore excess weight. To purchase a high end CF racing bike in anticipation of losing this weight before you've actually lost it, just seems "stupid" to me. It also seems "stupid" to exceed the manufacturer's standard weight capacity of any bicycle, as well.

It was also irresponsible of the salesman not to inform this guy about the manufacturer's standard weight capacity nor the physical dynamics involved in racing a bike. Losing weight should have been this guy's first item on the agenda, before being concerned about buying the lightest bike.
 

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Understand the OP's post, but
Did you consider that maybe this "stupid" guy doesn't plan on being overweight forever? Maybe this "stupid" guy recently lost 50 pounds and this bike is his reward to himself and motivation to get in better shape.

Nah, nevermind. Myopia and snap judgments are easier.
This is a really great response.

I'm probably still 20 lbs overweight after a too-long winter. That hasn't stopped me from weight-weenie-ing my bike, and all that does is motivate me to ride more.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Understand the OP's post, but

This is a really great response.

I'm probably still 20 lbs overweight after a too-long winter. That hasn't stopped me from weight-weenie-ing my bike, and all that does is motivate me to ride more.
Alright then, you'll readily admit that losing 20lbs. in the not too distant future, would be a more intelligent option, than just buying the lightest bike. I'd much rather buy a used MTB for exercise and training, until I got my weight down. Then I'd be ready to pull the trigger on a brand new 6 Series Madone.
 

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Heck, most of us could easily (me included) lose 5 lbs and save the several thousand and the time, TRYING to find a 5lb lighter bike ( if that is even possible for some with good bikes already). IF this was this guys reward for losing some of the weight, that is great. However, all too often... just like in golf, tennis, racquetball, etc. its a guy trying to buy a "game". Like the guy who can't putt, who buys a $375 Scotty Cameron when he would be better served with a Walmart putter and $350 of putting lessons. Sure it would be great to do both, but most people don't...they want a shortcut.

When I max out my physical fitness and my putting, I'll get the carbon frame and the Scotty :)
 

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I think F350 is right, a lot of folks look for a technical short cut....but not everyone is that way.

I screw around with three hobbies...cycling, golf and guitar. I'm not great at any of them, but I enjoy them and that's the motivation. In all three cases, I like to, when I'm able, buy some nice gear to use.

If I buy a high-end guitar, it doesn't mean I believe it will make me sound like John Lennon or Eric Clapton--but it does make me happy when I pick it up to play. Same with golf clubs, same with bikes.

I have examples in all three venues that are, in the eyes of many I suppose, well beyond my station in that particular pursuit. But I enjoy them, and since I pretty much do the hobbies for myself, that's really the only verdict I care about.

I don't mean that to come across as bragging in any way, just wanted to point out that everyone who has managed to acquire a nice bike or other toy isn't necessarily looking to fool themselves, or anyone else.
 

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Yes. For Trek racing road bikes, it's 275 lbs. This guy easily exceeded that limit buy at least fifty pounds.

www.trekbikes.com/faq/questions.php?questionid=104
So there is a weight limit on the bike purchased by this slightly obese person? And you know this how?
If the guy weighs 325, he's morbidly obese, not slightly obese - unless he's 7 feet tall and built like a linebacker.

I'm morbidly obese. I used to ride a Scott CR1. After that, I had a TIME RX Instinct. Now I have a Cyfac.

Bikes are like cars to some people... if you're really into them, you want yours to be the fastest, lightest, coolest one out there. It doesn't matter if you really need one or not; it's all about want. If a fat guy can afford to buy one, he should.

HOWEVER... if Trek has a weight limit, the shop should have told the guy that. Did you hear all of the conversation? Did the guy maybe say that he was buying a bike to ride after he had lost some weight?
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
I think F350 is right, a lot of folks look for a technical short cut....but not everyone is that way.

I screw around with three hobbies...cycling, golf and guitar. I'm not great at any of them, but I enjoy them and that's the motivation. In all three cases, I like to, when I'm able, buy some nice gear to use.

If I buy a high-end guitar, it doesn't mean I believe it will make me sound like John Lennon or Eric Clapton--but it does make me happy when I pick it up to play. Same with golf clubs, same with bikes.

I have examples in all three venues that are, in the eyes of many I suppose, well beyond my station in that particular pursuit. But I enjoy them, and since I pretty much do the hobbies for myself, that's really the only verdict I care about.

I don't mean that to come across as bragging in any way, just wanted to point out that everyone who has managed to acquire a nice bike or other toy isn't necessarily looking to fool themselves, or anyone else.
True JW, but your buying expensive guitars or golf gear doesn't really place either you or your hobby toys in jeopardy. Riding an expensive CF road racing bike as an obese person, places both the cyclist and the bike at risk. Having an accident while cycling, can greatly exacerbate potential injury, if the cyclists is obese. Furthermore, the high end CF bike will be viewed with constant suspicion, provided that it appears to have survived the collision unscathed.
 

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Did you consider that maybe this "stupid" guy doesn't plan on being overweight forever? Maybe this "stupid" guy recently lost 50 pounds and this bike is his reward to himself and motivation to get in better shape.

Nah, nevermind. Myopia and snap judgments are easier.
+1

I'm a clyde. I have a carbon bike. Clearly the bike doesn't make me go faster but it sure is fun to ride. I'm not naive enough to buy some 18 spoke wheels but the frame is a different story.

I'm down more than 30 lbs from a year ago between the riding, the walking and the weight lifting. I'm still a long way from my college riding days but it took me 20 years to get here it may take awhile to reverse some of the neglect.

Don't be so smug...you might not always look the way you do now.
 

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That's a fair point Z. But we don't really know what the buyer was planning on doing with the bike right away...maybe he was just wanting to hang it on a rack in his LR till he hit his goal...maybe not.

Just me, but I'd find more fault with the shop guy than I would with the buyer...
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 · (Edited)
If the guy weighs 325, he's morbidly obese, not slightly obese - unless he's 7 feet tall and built like a linebacker.

I'm morbidly obese. I used to ride a Scott CR1. After that, I had a TIME RX Instinct. Now I have a Cyfac.

Bikes are like cars to some people... if you're really into them, you want yours to be the fastest, lightest, coolest one out there. It doesn't matter if you really need one or not; it's all about want. If a fat guy can afford to buy one, he should.

HOWEVER... if Trek has a weight limit, the shop should have told the guy that. Did you hear all of the conversation? Did the guy maybe say that he was buying a bike to ride after he had lost some weight?
I don't know why I chose to use the word "slightly" (perhaps subconsciously I was trying to be polite).

I dunno, if someone is obese and simultaneously concerned about attaining greater speed when cycling, I'd think the most judicious manner in which to achieve such a goal would be to lose weight. That would not only be the most expedient route, but it would also be the most healthy method.
 

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I understand completely, I like to have the best of some things too...other times I avoid spending big doollar$ it until I get at least "decent" at the activity :) It all depends on the activity.

I think F350 is right, a lot of folks look for a technical short cut....but not everyone is that way.

I screw around with three hobbies...cycling, golf and guitar. I'm not great at any of them, but I enjoy them and that's the motivation. In all three cases, I like to, when I'm able, buy some nice gear to use.

If I buy a high-end guitar, it doesn't mean I believe it will make me sound like John Lennon or Eric Clapton--but it does make me happy when I pick it up to play. Same with golf clubs, same with bikes.

I have examples in all three venues that are, in the eyes of many I suppose, well beyond my station in that particular pursuit. But I enjoy them, and since I pretty much do the hobbies for myself, that's really the only verdict I care about.

I don't mean that to come across as bragging in any way, just wanted to point out that everyone who has managed to acquire a nice bike or other toy isn't necessarily looking to fool themselves, or anyone else.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 · (Edited)
+1

I'm a clyde. I have a carbon bike. Clearly the bike doesn't make me go faster but it sure is fun to ride. I'm not naive enough to buy some 18 spoke wheels but the frame is a different story.

I'm down more than 30 lbs from a year ago between the riding, the walking and the weight lifting. I'm still a long way from my college riding days but it took me 20 years to get here it may take awhile to reverse some of the neglect.

Don't be so smug...you might not always look the way you do now.
Sorry, Chudak!

I didn't intend to offend or appear to be smug, but you've just got to admit the fact, that the best way to increase speed in the long run, is to simply lose weight.

I say, buy a used MTB or whatever. Then train and exercise until you've lost a sufficient amount of weight. Next, buy the ideal CF road bike that suits your proper anatomy.

A high impact collision on a CF road bike carrying an obese person, sounds fairly catastrophic to me.
 

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Sorry, Chudak!

I didn't intend to offend or appear to be smug, but you've just got to admit the fact, that the best way to increase speed in the long run, is to simply lose weight.

I say, buy a used MTB or whatever. Then train and exercise until you've lost a sufficient amount of weight. Next, buy the ideal CF road bike that suits your proper anatomy.

A high impact collsion on a CF road bike carrying an obese person, sounds fairly catastrophic to me.
But no one cares what you say.

I'm a lard ass. I ride a $6500 Cyfac. Should I return it or stop riding it until I'm slim enough that you approve?

A high impact collision on a CF road bike carrying ANY person, sounds fairly catastrophic to me.
 

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Maybe the OP is just jealous, because all that he could afford from that shop is a lock, and not a high end carbon frame :prrr:
 
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