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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
How many people out there use non-setback posts on their road bikes? My saddle nose to BB center horizontal distance is 3.5cm. To get to this position, I have to push the saddle almost all the way forward on my current post, which has 25mm of setback. If I went with a non-setback post (I am about to get a new one), it would clamp pretty much in the middle of my rails. The only hesitancy that I am having is that I really don’t see many zero-setback road posts in use. Almost everyone on the road is on a setback post of some sort. Is my saddle nose to BB distance unusually short or something? Does a zero-setback post or more forward saddle position change a road bike’s handling at all? Any insight would be helpful.
 

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corning my own beef
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Instead of getting too wrapped up in the numbers and measurements, you might consider asking yourslf how you FEEL with your saddle in different fore/aft positions. The correct position for you is the one that feels good and fits you, regardless of the measurement.

IMO, Thomson is the gold standard of (affordable) seatposts with no setback.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
I have recently moved my saddle forward after a pro fitting session. My saddle was a little too far back and too high. It does feel better now in the new position of 3.5cm behind the BB center. I was reaching a little too far before. I also like Thompson posts, I have one on each of my MTBs. I am just not getting why so few people use no setback posts on the road...

Perhaps there are more than I realize, and I have just never noticed them before.
 

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Just Plain Bitter
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Check ebay. I have an Easton EC70 0 offset up there now for sale. Pretty sure you could grab it way below the $129.00 it cost me 6 months ago.
 

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If you need to have your saddle that far forward you need a zero setback post. Thompson is the only way to go: beautiful, durable, easily adjustable.
 

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I just got a Thompson zero setback this winter. It solved several fit and saddle pain problems that I'd been ignoring for years. I wish I'd done this years ago. Now I'm riding with (almost) no pain in shoulders, back, and my saddle just magically got more comfortable.
 

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Yup...have them on all of my bikes...All Thompson Elites. I have short legs and short femurs and even with the zero degree post my seat is most of the way forward on the post.

If your seat is pushed all the way forward on a laid back post, going to a zero degree will not only likely center up the seat on the rails, but give you more options when it comes to fit on the bike because you will now have some fore/aft movement available to make adjustments.
 

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KennyG said:
I was reaching a little too far before.
Shifting your seat fore/aft is no way to cure a reach problem. If you're fit session suggested placing your seat in its current position and you are able to do so with a setback post before running out of rail adjustment, then don't worry about the look. Yeah, it doesn't look euro-pro and you'll be labelled a Fred for life but...;-)

As far as I'm concerned, zero setback posts are not a good match with frames because seat angles weren't designed with zero setback posts in mind, so you're more likely to be able to adjust your seat properly with the forward rail clamp on them.

Frame angles have not changed since the advent of zero setback posts. So either you order a custom frame made to match with a zero setback post or you recheck you position.
 

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Peter P. said:
As far as I'm concerned, zero setback posts are not a good match with frames because seat angles weren't designed with zero setback posts in mind, so you're more likely to be able to adjust your seat properly with the forward rail clamp on them.

Frame angles have not changed since the advent of zero setback posts. So either you order a custom frame made to match with a zero setback post or you recheck you position.
That's a pretty short sighted view when it comes to bike fitting...way to lump everybody in the same body type :thumbsup:

Some people just have short legs and or short femurs that require them to move the seat forward or go to a zero degree post...it happens...I know those of us that have this disability are freaks...such is life.

For me I need at a minimum a 73.5 degree STA, 170mm cranks, a zero degree seat post and the seat still pushed most of the way forward to get to a KOP position and I'm 5'11" tall....but that's just me :)

But then...I don't know anything, I'm just some idiot posting on a public web forum :eek:
 

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Funny I just asked a question the Components Forum about Zero setback seatposts. My short list was the Thomson Masterpiece, Easton EC90, VCRC carbon and the 3T Doric Team. I didn't wait long for recommendations- I just went to my favorite LBS Vecchio's and ordered the 3T. Honestly, the Thomson is the gold standard for zero setback posts but I already have them on 3 of my bikes and wanted something different so I went with the 3T. Plus was the red stripe down the side! :) I have a Colnago in PR00 colors and will do it up with White and Red accents. Me thinks its going to going to look sharp! :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Peter P. said:
Shifting your seat fore/aft is no way to cure a reach problem. If you're fit session suggested placing your seat in its current position and you are able to do so with a setback post before running out of rail adjustment, then don't worry about the look. Yeah, it doesn't look euro-pro and you'll be labelled a Fred for life but...;-)

As far as I'm concerned, zero setback posts are not a good match with frames because seat angles weren't designed with zero setback posts in mind, so you're more likely to be able to adjust your seat properly with the forward rail clamp on them.

Frame angles have not changed since the advent of zero setback posts. So either you order a custom frame made to match with a zero setback post or you recheck you position.
My saddle moving forward was not to resolve an upper body reach issue. I was "reaching" a little too far with my legs on my pedal stroke. My fitter moved my saddle slightly down then slightly forward, and had specific reasons for both movements.

Although I can get my saddle to the correct position with a setback post, my fitter and the shop mechanic advised that it is better to clamp a saddle closer to the center of the usable rails rather than the back end of the usable rails due to the saddle's natural flexing action working more as designed with the centerd clamp placement. This seems to make sense, but I haven't noticed a harsher ride since moving the saddle to the back of the usable rail space.
 

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me too. the ec-90 cost a fortune, but I'm riding a bike that's just on the hairy edge of being too big for me. I was able to move the seat forward a little bit to help w/ a reach problem without failing the KOPS test. I'm pretty happy and it's a fine looking piece of carbon!
 

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duh...
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Peter P. said:
So either you order a custom frame made to match with a zero setback post or you recheck you position.


if you need a steeper STA than stock, then a zero setback post achieves the same thing as a custom w/ a steeper STA (assume WB/CS lengths remain the same). prob a little cheaper too
 
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