Road Bike, Cycling Forums banner
1 - 13 of 13 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
99 Posts
Discussion Starter · #1 ·
So I ride a Pinarello Dogma 60.1 with Super Record 11 and Zipp 202 wheels. I weigh in at 220 lbs, and when I really power up a hill on my granny gear of 53/25, I can hear my rear hub creaking and sometimes I can also hear the rear spokes scraping against the cassette. Has anyone else experienced this problem too?

I spoke with my bike mechanic and he called up Zipp directly and they said it's because of the new 2010 hub design and how it is it strong or made to hold high spoke tension. This obviously wouldn't be so noticeable for light weight riders, but for heavy riders like myself (6' 3") he recommended I either swap out the rear hub with something stiffer or buy different wheels. This was the reason why he doesn't sell Zipp wheels. He claims the stock hoops are really great but the hubs are the weakest link.

Needless to say, i ordered a set of Enve Composite wheels 45 tubulars with alchemy hubs
 

·
Wheel Builder
Joined
·
133 Posts
I know that in theory, rear hubs "flex". As a cyclist I have never, ever felt this effect specifically. From riding bikes of yore, I have experienced frame/crank flex. By comparison, newer bikes in today's market are vastly more stiff/more efficient at power transfer.

In my opinion, I would speculate that there's more to the story here affecting your wheel's performance than the explanation of hub flex. I have never ridden 202s, so take my non-experience into consideration.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
1,297 Posts
Don't mean to sound like a d*ck, but @ 220, you're gonna make most wheels flex, unless they are just horribly overbuilt. Anything with a low spoke count, regardless of build, isn't going to be up to the task.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,103 Posts
I doubt the hub or axle is flexing. The new Zipp hubs result in wheels that have exceptionally poor torque stiffness and strength because of their lacing configuration. This isn't a problem for most riders, but since you are heavy and strong, I'm not surprised. You are probably causing some of the spokes on the NDS to go completely slack, which will make the wheel weak laterally and probably result in broken spokes eventually. Also, I think your derailleur rather than the cassette is rubbing on the spokes.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
12,085 Posts
backinthesaddle said:
Don't mean to sound like a d*ck, but @ 220, you're gonna make most wheels flex, unless they are just horribly overbuilt. Anything with a low spoke count, regardless of build, isn't going to be up to the task.
+1. Don't the 202s have a weight limit around 180lbs?
 

·
'brifter' is f'ing stupid
Joined
·
15,489 Posts
if you're pedaling, the spokes can't hit the cassette...for 2 reasons
1) the cassette is turning at the same speed as the hub, and the spokes...
2) the chain (which you stated was on the largest cog) is in the way...
soooo, if the cassette and the rest of the wheel are turning at the same rpm nothing can scrape against anything else.
not to mention the fact that if your cassette was hitting your spokes, your derailleur would probably be all over the road in little pieces.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
3,254 Posts
"if your cassette was hitting your spokes"....so would the wheel. I put a zipp 303 front wheel into someone's rear der. when he pulled in front of me to avoid a truck and it promptly broke 8 of the 9 spokes on the NDS...needless to say, I hit the ground. Doesn't take much to snap those CXrays when they are moving.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
99 Posts
Discussion Starter · #9 · (Edited)
Thanks for the input everyone. I understand I'm too heavy a rider for these wheels. That makes sense.

But as far as the creaking goes, I can see how the cassette might not be scraping against the spokes, but how about leaning against the spokes (causing the creaking)? Would that be possible in my case? So when I mash in the granny gear, the power I put on the rear load would cause the spokes to twist a bit (because the Zipp hubs known for holding spokes at low tension), causing the cassette to lean against them?

I've given up riding these Zipp 202 wheels, but for my future wheels, I just want to have an understanding so I know what shouldn't be happening.
 

·
'brifter' is f'ing stupid
Joined
·
15,489 Posts
LouisVuitton said:
Thanks for the input everyone. I understand I'm too heavy a rider for these wheels. That makes sense.

But as far as the creaking goes, I can see how the cassette might not be scraping against the spokes, but how about leaning against the spokes (causing the creaking)? Would that be possible in my case? So when I mash in the granny gear, the power I put on the rear load would cause the spokes to twist a bit (because the Zipp hubs known for holding spokes at low tension), causing the cassette to lean against them?

I've given up riding these Zipp 202 wheels, but for my future wheels, I just want to have an understanding so I know what shouldn't be happening.
there is pretty much no way your spokes are hitting your cassette...take a look at your wheel and just visualize how much it would have to flex to have that happen. why are you "mashing" in the granny gear? be gentle...smooth. mash in the big gears when you are sprinting...smoothly, tho
 

·
wheelbuilder
Joined
·
2,220 Posts
LouisVuitton said:
granny gear of 53/25,

Needless to say, i ordered a set of Enve Composite wheels 45 tubulars with alchemy hubs
I hope the first part is a type-o.

You did the right thing in the end. At your weight, you are better served with custom wheels or at least wheels intended for clydesdales.

-Eric
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
99 Posts
Discussion Starter · #13 ·
Yeah, I meant to say 39/25 instead. :) Yeah, screw it you're right. I'll just bank on my new wheelset. It's going to be custom made for my weight anyway.
 
1 - 13 of 13 Posts
Top