Road Bike, Cycling Forums banner

1 - 11 of 11 Posts

·
Registered
Joined
·
554 Posts
Discussion Starter #1

·
For president!
Joined
·
7,802 Posts
ravenmore said:
Aight - just got a heart rate computer and am trying to figure out my "zones". Found this link for a zone calculator and thought I'd share:

http://www.machinehead-software.co.uk/bike/heart_rate/heart_rate_zone_calculator_abcc_bcf.html

Anyone familiar with this type of training care to share any tips/tricks? I'm still researching this - there seem to be lots of different approaches?
Training off of your maximum heart rate is an 'ok' but not great way to go. Current thinking is that you should base your training off of LT, or lactate threshold. For our purposes, it's what your HR is for a one hour time trial. See these recent topics in the Racing, Training...Forum:

http://forums.roadbikereview.com/showthread.php?t=56008

http://forums.roadbikereview.com/showthread.php?t=54096

http://forums.roadbikereview.com/showthread.php?t=51686

http://forums.roadbikereview.com/showthread.php?t=51510

Good luck,

Silas
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
173 Posts
You can find a lot of free training advise, the tough part is drafting a program that works for you. First, however, I suggest you get a bit more crisp about your training zones. I looked at your Zone Calculator and I have too comments; 1) Age based zones are virtually meaningless, 2) Max Heart Rate is not very useful and a bad place to start for determining your training zones. Most training programs would recommend you determine your Anaerobic Threshold and calculate your zones from there. Those zones depend on what program you are following and whether you are training HR or Wattage (zones are the same as HR and Watts correlate, but zones will be measured in one or the other).

There are a couple ways to determine your Lactate Threshold Heart Rate or LT.Ii like the Conconi test, others like the 30 minute Time Trial. Both will get you where you need to go within some small variance. For an explanation of zones and some simple ways to determine LT, see http://www.cycle-smart.com/coaching/sample.html.

You may also want to consult "The Cyclists' Training Bible" by Joe Friel as well. Both aforementioned sources have a lot of good data about training zones. You can also consult the Ultra Cycling site for distance specific ideas: http://www.ultracycling.com/training/dc_training_fast.html. For a basic road racers example schedule see: http://www.cycle-smart.com/coaching/sample.html.

Most of all, design a program you know you will stick with.

Have fun and good luck,

Jaime
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
554 Posts
Discussion Starter #4
thanks - this is a new area for me so I have a big learning curve. I was planning on training around my lactate threshold, which near as I can tell appears to be around 164 bpm for me. Weird how you can feel it, but right around there is where I'll start to go anaerobic I think.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
173 Posts
There are several good threads on training on this site. Take a gander and you'll likely get a pretty good primer on training concepts. I like the links I gave you for brevity.

A quick thought (well, two) in response to your last point:
- Most systems agree that you need to build in some form of periodization into your program. In other words, just doing threshold training will have limited benefit. You'll want to mix up base training, threshold intervals, super-threshold intervals (sprints), etc. As it turns out, you'll find the variety much more tolerable than targeting the same system every day.
- You may also want to start off with quite a bit of base training (I hate this part). Your body producing a number of very beneficial adaptations when training in the base aerobic zone (easy conversational pace, for me 122 - 139 bpm). You burn fat and develop midocondrial capacity which becomes the foundation for further training. Don't skip this part.

Have fun and good luck.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
jgrantv10 said:
There are several good threads on training on this site. Take a gander and you'll likely get a pretty good primer on training concepts. I like the links I gave you for brevity.

A quick thought (well, two) in response to your last point:
- Most systems agree that you need to build in some form of periodization into your program. In other words, just doing threshold training will have limited benefit. You'll want to mix up base training, threshold intervals, super-threshold intervals (sprints), etc. As it turns out, you'll find the variety much more tolerable than targeting the same system every day.
- You may also want to start off with quite a bit of base training (I hate this part). Your body producing a number of very beneficial adaptations when training in the base aerobic zone (easy conversational pace, for me 122 - 139 bpm). You burn fat and develop midocondrial capacity which becomes the foundation for further training. Don't skip this part.

Have fun and good luck.
You mentioned that your base aerobic zone is 122-139. What is your max HR and your resting HR? Only reason I ask is because if I have been training in the wrong freaking zone I'm going to be upset. I've been cruising along at 75% of my max to establish a strong aerobic base. Is this too high?

thanks!
 

·
NeoRetroGrouch
Joined
·
6,491 Posts
winston13 said:
You mentioned that your base aerobic zone is 122-139. What is your max HR and your resting HR? Only reason I ask is because if I have been training in the wrong freaking zone I'm going to be upset. I've been cruising along at 75% of my max to establish a strong aerobic base. Is this too high?

thanks!
Based on MaxHR and assuming LTHR at about 85% of MHR, 75% would be right at the top end of the traditional "endurance" zone. - TF
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
173 Posts
That is right.

As I mentioned before, different systems will "draw the line" at different percentages of LTHR. I am not a big fan of basing zones on MaxHR. I have a good friend who I ride with a lot (so we review one another's output often and can easily compare our performance) who's MaxHR is a beat or two lower than mine, but his LTHR is several beats above mine. Our output (watts) at any given HR up to LTHR is the same, but I "crack" or start using my anaerobic engine before he does. BIG difference in our peak performance.

Since you asked, the divisions I use look like the following (Note; The Middle zones ae what other systems might refer to as Tempo:
1 Recovery 0 122
2 Easy 122 139
3 Light 139 156
4a Middle (flats) 160 165
4b Middle (climbing)165 170
4c Middle (racing) 160 172
5a Super Threshold 172 176
5b Aerobic Capacity177 181
5c Max 182 +
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
4,808 Posts
jgrantv10 said:
- You may also want to start off with quite a bit of base training (I hate this part). Your body producing a number of very beneficial adaptations when training in the base aerobic zone (easy conversational pace, for me 122 - 139 bpm). You burn fat and develop midocondrial capacity which becomes the foundation for further training. Don't skip this part.
I ride solo most of the time, and 122-139 is no where near attainable. I'm pushing 160 for an avg.

174+ I start to blow up.

150- it doesn't feel like I'm working. and I'd be doing a 12-14 mph pace.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
173 Posts
Right. Doing base work shouldn't feel like you are exerting much. It is very hard to keep in the proper zone (at least for me). Once you start taking in the scenery and enjoying the ride, you naturally start to pick up the pace. Great. A fun ride. I just isn't base training. Sorry.
 

·
Registered
Joined
·
9 Posts
jgrantv10 said:
That is right.

As I mentioned before, different systems will "draw the line" at different percentages of LTHR. I am not a big fan of basing zones on MaxHR. I have a good friend who I ride with a lot (so we review one another's output often and can easily compare our performance) who's MaxHR is a beat or two lower than mine, but his LTHR is several beats above mine. Our output (watts) at any given HR up to LTHR is the same, but I "crack" or start using my anaerobic engine before he does. BIG difference in our peak performance.

Since you asked, the divisions I use look like the following (Note; The Middle zones ae what other systems might refer to as Tempo:
1 Recovery 0 122
2 Easy 122 139
3 Light 139 156
4a Middle (flats) 160 165
4b Middle (climbing)165 170
4c Middle (racing) 160 172
5a Super Threshold 172 176
5b Aerobic Capacity177 181
5c Max 182 +
I understand the whole LTHR. I've even gotten to the point where I can tell how many BPM I am away from it. For me, my LTHR is in the upper 160's usually about 168 depending on how much riding I have done in the previous days. On my trainer, this is the point when my BPM to watts starts getting out of whack (less efficient). Under race conditions it's not uncommon for me to average in the high 180's over an hour period. I actually did a MTB race last summer and averaged 195 over an hour and a half. Of course I felt like I was going to blow chunks the whole time but I was able to keep going. My aerobic capacity is now much better and I don't usually see the high numbers unless I'm climbing. For my base training I have been staying at least 8 BPM below my LT. Does this sound right for everyone or am I training in the big grey cloud that everyone talks about?
 
1 - 11 of 11 Posts
Top