2016 Trek Madone aero road bike revealed

Fully revamped race rig fills wind cheating hole in bike maker's line-up

Road Bike
The top end Madone 9-Series Race Shop Limited ($13,650) comes with H1 geometry, 700-Series OCLV Carbon, Shimano Dura-Ace Di2 9070 drivetrain, and Bontrager Aeolus 5 D3 TLR wheels.

The top end Madone 9-Series Race Shop Limited ($13,650) comes with H1 geometry, 700-Series OCLV Carbon, Shimano Dura-Ace Di2 9070 drivetrain, and Bontrager Aeolus 5 D3 TLR wheels.

Another bike launch, another über integrated, wind cheating aero road machine hitting the market. This time it’s the gang from Trek who rolled out the latest iteration of its popular Madone. But this new bike shares little more than a name with its predecessor. Indeed, the steed that Trek is unabashedly calling the “Ultimate Race Bike” is a true aero roadster, something that was heretofore missing in the Waterloo, Wisconsin-based company’s line-up.

With the project, Trek engineers set out to create a bike that surpassed previous achievements in aerodynamic design and ride quality, enhancing it through a host of creative integrated designs. Here’s a part-by-part breakdown of the new Trek Madone, which will have its official WorldTour coming out party underneath members of the Trek Factory Racing team starting July 4 at the 2016 Tour de France.

Trek continues its use Kammtail tube shapes.

Trek continues its use Kammtail tube shapes.

Aero Tube Shapes

Trek continues to use Kammtail tube shapes, but says the new OCLV carbon Madone employs a revised KVF (Kammtail Virtual Foil) where truncated airfoil profiles lower drag of both frame and fork. The idea is that the virtual tail of the airfoil bends to respond to the angle of crosswinds. Other frame highlights include a more robust fork for increased lateral stiffness and more precise handling, and molded carbon dropouts that reduce weight.

Trek designed a unique tube-in-tube IsoSpeed decoupler, which allows the inside tube to move independently of the outer aero tube shape.

Trek designed a unique tube-in-tube IsoSpeed decoupler, which allows the inside tube to move independently of the outer aero tube shape.

IsoSpeed Added

Technology that debuted on the Spring Classics focused Domane endurance road bike, then was applied to the Boone cyclocross bike, has now made the leap to full on race machine. The new specially-tuned Madone IsoSpeed decoupler is fully integrated, maintaining efficient aerodynamics, while adding a measure of vertical compliance and smooth ride quality that you wouldn’t normally expect from an aero road bike.

To achieve the desired level of aero integration, Trek designed a unique tube-in-tube IsoSpeed decoupler, which allows the inside tube to move independently of the outer aero tube shape. Trek says this design makes the new Madone a whopping 57.5 percent more vertically compliant than its nearest competitor.

Continue to page 2 to learn more about the new Madone and see pricing and spec »
About the author: Jason Sumner

An avid cyclist, Jason Sumner has been writing about two-wheeled pursuits of all kinds since 1999. He’s covered the Tour de France, the Olympic Games, and dozens of other international cycling events. He also likes to throw himself into the fray, penning first-person accounts of cycling adventures all over the globe. Sumner, who joined the RoadBikeReview.com / Mtbr.com staff in 2013, has also done extensive gear testing and is the author of the cycling guide book "75 Classic Rides: Colorado." When not writing or riding, the native Coloradoan can be found enjoying time with his wife Lisa and daughter Cora.


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